Feeds:
Posts
Comments

My great-great-great-great grandmother Dionysia Northeast was born to Thomas and Elizabeth Northeast around 1797. She was baptized on June 20, 1797, in North Tidworth, Wiltshire. The parish church was Holy Trinity.

Holy Trinity, North Tidworth, Wiltshire

Dionysia married John Ansted on April 11, 1820 in North Tidworth. They were married by licence and both signed the register, which was witnessed by Thomas Barnes Northeast, Dionysia’s brother, and Eliza Black.

Their first child, son John, was born on May 21, 1821 and baptized on December 28, 1821 at St. Botolph’s, Aldgate in Middlesex. Their first daughter, Rebecca, followed on April 8, 1823 and was baptized at St. Botolph on January 14, 1824. Second daughter, Dionysia (my great-great-great grandmother), was born on July 27, 1827 and baptized a year later on August 6, 1828.

I suspect much of the reason Dionysia’s baptism followed so long after her birth is due to the fact her mother sadly passed away a few days after her birth. She was buried on August 10, 1827 in the parish of St. Botolph.

While I was tracing Dionysia’s life I became interested in her family – particularly her brother Thomas Barnes Northeast, and wondered whether there were any living Northeast relations for me to find. My next post will look at her siblings and what became of them.

 

Visit Smart Genealogy for help with your own family history research.

 

After a very long break, I’m back blogging with the next ancestor on my list: my 4g-grandmother Alice Maria Hardy.

Alice Maria was baptized on December 29, 1782 at St Stephen’s Church in Norwich, Norfolk County, England. Her parents were James Hardy (1744-1817) and Eleanor Le Bas (1751/52-1846).

Alice’s father had been married previously and Alice had two older half-sisters, Mary (abt. 1774-1789) and Frances (abt. 1775-1776), from her father’s first marriage to Mary Bird. James and Eleanor had George Le Bas Hardy (abt. 1778-abt. 1818) followed by Charles (abt. 1780-1829). Alice was next, followed by James (abt. 1784-1814), Harriett (abt. 1786-unknown), William (abt. 1787-unknown), Frances (1790-unknown), and Henry Leaverock (abt. 1792-abt. 1793).

Alice next appears in the historical record at the time of her marriage. On May 25, 1813, Alice, a single woman of the Parish of Hethersett, Norfolk, married Thomas Burton, a single man of the Parish of Langley, by licence. I assume the wedding took place in the St. Remigius church in Hethersett. The witnesses appear to be Alice’s brother George Le Bas Hardy and Thomas’ mother (Elizabeth Burton). Alice was 30 at the time of her marriage, which seems relatively old for a bride in that era.

Alice and Thomas’ first child, Emily Maria, was born within a year of their marriage, on May 20, 1814, and was baptized on June 12 of that year. As with all their children, the baptism took place in St. Michael’s church in Langley, Norfolk. Their first son, my 3g-grandfather Thomas, was born on May 28, 1816 and baptized on June 28 of that year. Henry Burton was born on July 11, 1817 and baptized two days later. In November 1818, a son Charles was born but he, sadly, passed away in May 1819. Another son, Charles Hardy Burton was baptized on May 7, 1820. Harriett Elizabeth was baptized on December 17, 1821. Son William was baptized on August 2, 1823 and Alfred was baptized on October 24, 1824. George Edward was baptized on July 23, 1827 and, at the age of 46, Alice gave birth to her last child, Anne Mary, who was baptized on January 19, 1829. In total, Alice and Thomas had ten children, nine of whom survived their young childhood.

St. Michael and All Saints, Langley, Norfolk

In 1841, Thomas was not found in the home on the day of the census. I believe he was in London at the time, but have not conclusively proven that theory. Alice was listed as ‘farmer’ along with her children Emily (27), Thomas (25), Harriett (19), William (17), Anne (12) and several servants. Henry, Charles, Alfred and George also do not appear on the census and I have yet to find them elsewhere.

Alice’s son George Edward passed away on June 5, 1843 at 16 years of age. Her daughter Harriet married John Ansted in 1847 and my 3g-grandparents, Thomas and Dionysia Ansted, married in 1848.

By the 1851 census Alice is shown as the 65-year-old wife of Thomas Burton (a farmer of 540 acres employing 20 labourers and 5 boys). Also at home are William (26) and Anne Mary (21), along with a 10-year-old visitor named Harriett and three servants. They are living in Langley Grange.

Langley Grange, Langley, Norfolk

Eldest daughter Emily married Stephen Leeds in 1856.  And, sometime between the 1851 and 1861 censuses, William married Maria. I have yet to find a record for their marriage or her last name.

In the 1861 census, 77-year-old Alice is found with Thomas (farmer of 450 acres) along with their daughter Annie (30) and three servants. They continue to reside in the Grange.

The October 21, 1865, Norfolk News newspaper contained two notices of bankruptcy, one for Thomas and one for son William. Apparently Thomas was not quite as prosperous as one might have assumed looking at the home they lived in and the number of acres he farmed. He died on August 10, 1867, and likely left Alice in somewhat reduced circumstances.

And, indeed, Alice (89) was found living on Chapel Field Road in Norwich with her 63-year-old housekeeper in the 1871 census, no longer in the stately Langley Grange. She passed away on October 12, 1874 in Norwich and was buried on October 16, 1874 in the Parish of Chedgrave.

Many of her children outlived her. Thomas passed away in Quebec in 1898. Harriett died in 1901, followed by Emily in 1906 and William in 1909. Alfred was quite an accomplished surgeon and left a substantial fortune to his nephews, Harriett’s sons, when he died in 1907. Anne Mary died a spinster in 1918, having spent much of her adult life living with her sisters Harriett and Emily and then with her nephew Edward Ansted. Census records indicate Henry may have lived and married in Madras, India, but by 1881 he was back in England and died sometime after 1891. Charles is the only child for which I have yet to find any indication of what his adult life may have looked like.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week fifty-two – just in the nick of time!

My great-great-great-great grandfather Thomas Burton was born in about 1786 to Thomas and Elizabeth (Sendall) Burton.

He married Alice Maria Hardy, daughter of James and Eleanor (Le Bas) Hardy, who was born about 1782. They were married on May 25, 1813 in Norfolk.

Their children included Thomas (born 1816), Emily (1816), Harriet Elizabeth (1822), William (1824), Alfred (1825), and Ann Mary (1829).

The 1841 census finds Alice (55) at home, along with Thomas (25), William (17), Emily (25), Harriett (19), and Ann (12). They are living at Langley Grange in Norfolk and Thomas appears to be away visiting in London. Also in the home are four servants.

The 1851 census finds Thomas (64) and Alice (65) still at the Langley Grange. Thomas is a a farmer of 540 acres employing 20 labourers and 5 boys. The children still at home include William (36) and Ann Mary (21). Also in the household is Harriet Cross (10), a visitor; servant Mary Ann Wright; servant Eleanor Whiting; and groom William Smith.

The 1861 census finds Thomas (75) and Alice (77)  at the Grange. Thomas was a farmer of 450 acres employing a number of men and boys. Also at home was Annie (30). The family employed several servants including, Susan Bickers (house servant), Harriet Day (dairymaid), and Richard Alexander (groom).

Thomas died on August 10, 1867.

The 1871 census found Alice (89) living alone with a housekeeper, Ann Futbrice (sp?) in Heigham, Norwich. Alice died on October 12, 1874.

 

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week fifty-one, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great-great grandmother was Sarah Bohle. Sarah was born around 1795 to David and Elizabeth Bohle.

She married Richard Salter on January 16, 1814 in Montreal’s Anglican Christ Church Cathedral. Sarah and Richard had at least twelve children: David, Jane, Rosanna, William Richard, Elizabeth, Pricilla, John, Peter, Frederick, Richard, Francis and Henry.

Richard died in June of 1847. Sarah followed just a few months later, passing away on November 1, 1847.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week fifty, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great-great grandfather was Richard Salter. I don’t have any information at this point about his parents or where he was born. My current belief is that he was born in England in approximately 1782 and came to Canada as part of the 49th Regiment around the time of the War of 1812.

He married Sarah Bohle on January 16, 1814 in Montreal’s Anglican Christ Church Cathedral. He was then a sergeant in the 49th Regiment. They were both of the age of majority.

I know of several children born to Richard and Sarah, including David (born 1815), Jane (born 1817), Rosanna (born 1819), William Richard (born 1821), Elizabeth (born 1823), Pricilla (born 1824), John (born 1825), Peter (born 1828), Frederick (born 1830), Richard (born 1832), Francis (born 1834) and Henry (born 1837).

Most of the baptism records for the children indicate that Richard was the Barrack Sergeant for the Montreal Garrison.

Richard died in 1847:

Richard Salter late barrack sergeant in the Garrison of Montreal died on the thirteenth day of June one thousand eight hundred and forty seven aged sixty five years and was buried on the sixteenth immediately following…

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week forty-nine, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great-great grandfather was Robert Williams. He was born in Ireland, likely in the late 1780s. He married Elizabeth Hamilton around 1808.

They emigrated to Canada in the early 1820s and settled in the Ormstown, Quebec area.

According to a Deed of Donation, as indexed, from  April 18, 1831, the family had several children:

Robert Williams & his wife Elizabeth Hamilton; their minor children Isabella, Sarah, James, William, Elizabeth, Charlotte, Mary , Hamilton, Robert Alexander & Andrew; their son Thomas of age of majority.

I don’t have a great deal more solid information on the family at this point – I’m not even entirely positive when Robert and Elizabeth died.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week forty-eight, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great-great grandmother was Agnes Doan. She was born on October 6, 1799, in Solebury, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, United States. Her parents were Mahlon and Rebecca (Hartley) Doan.

The family moved north to Upper Canada in 1808, ultimately settling in East Gwillimbury. They were Quakers and the Buckingham Monthly Meeting of Friends provided a certificate to the Yonge Street Monthly Meeting attesting to the family’s worth:

To the Monthly Meeting of Friends held at Yonge Street in Upper Canada
Mahlon Doan & Rebeckah his wife being about to remove and settle within the limits of your meeting have requested our Certificate in order to join in membership with you. They have been in a good degree orderly in their lives and conversation and diligent in attending our Religious meetings and on enquiry no other appears but they have settled their affairs to satisfaction Therefore we recommend them with their six minor children to wit (Anna, James Hartley, Agness, Johnathan, Rebeccah & Elizabeth Balderston) to your Christian care desiring their preservation in the truth and subscribe ourselves your friends. From the Monthly Meeting of Friends held at Buckingham, Bucks County, state of Pennsylvania the 4th day of the 4th month, 1808.

Agnes married Harrison Haight around 1817. They had several children including Melissa, Silas, Mahlon, Samuel, Joseph, Betsy, Sophronia and Susan. In 1834, the couple became one of the first families to settle in what eventually became Little Britain, Ontario.

Agnes passed away in September 1842.

 

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week forty-seven, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great-great grandfather was Harrison Haight. He was born sometime around 1797 in the United States, likely in New York. By the time he married Agnes Doan around 1817 he had moved north to Ontario, possibly with his parents.

In 1834, Harrison and Agnes settled in Little Britain, Ontario. According to the Church Centennial, Little Britain, 1839-1939:

Harrison Haight, Jr. was closely associated with the early development of Little Britain. He is described as being a muscular and physically powerful man, well over six feet tall, and was thus well fitted for the rigours of life in a stern, new land. A keen intellect and high moral purpose also combined in him to produce a settler of value to the early community.
The Indians found in Harrison Haight a trusted friend. They would talk to him when they would not say a word to others. His home was always open to them and they entered without knocking. A locked door made them suspicious.

Harrison and Agnes had several children. As far as I have been able to determine so far these children include, Melissa, Silas, Mahlon, Samuel, Joseph, Betsy, Sophronia and Susan. Agnes passed away in 1842.

A family legend told to me by my great aunts suggests that somewhere in the early 1840s, Harrison became convinced the world was going to end. At that time he gave away many of his farming implements, put on his best night clothes and climbed to the roof of his house to await the end. The following morning, obviously, he had to climb back down and attempt to retrieve his goods. I’m sure I’ll never be able to prove this story – but it has always intrigued me!

Following Agnes’ death, Harrison married Elizabeth McKinley on November 28, 1844, in Darlington, Ontario.

The 1861 census finds Harrison (64) and Elizabeth (57) in Reach, Ontario. And in the 1871 census, Harrison (74) and Elizabeth (68), they are still there.

The 1881 census for Minto, Ontario, finds Harrison (84) with his son Joseph (47) and his wife Moriah (47) and their children Reuben Thomas (24), John Harrison (22), Joseph (20), and Stephen (17).  Elizabeth (84) appears to be living with a Robert Horner (78) in Scugog, Ontario. Robert is possibly her brother.

I am not entirely certain when Harrison died.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week forty-six, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great-great grandfather was Nicholas Thomas. He was born sometime around 1770, likely in Cornwall, England.

Pallot’s Marriage Index for England shows Nicholas Thomas marrying Elizabeth Philipps in 1799. They had several children – I know of Reuben, Sarah, John, Ann, Elizabeth, William, Luke, Mary, Jane, and Nicholas.

The 1841 census shows Nicholas (70) and Elizabeth (60) living in Luxulyan, Cornwall with their children still at home, Luke (25), Nicholas (20) and Susan (14). Nicholas was a farmer.

He died in 1848. I have yet to determine when Elizabeth died.

 

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week forty-five, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

I know very little about my great-great-great-great grandmother Margaret Glover. She was born in Ireland in 1774, but I don’t know who her parents were.

She married John Lloyd around 1798. After their marriage and the birth of their nine children (Caleb, Eliza, Glover, Marmaduke, Maria, Jane, Margaret, John and William), they emigrated to Ontario, Canada, ultimately settling in Brock Township.

John died on August 22, 1848 and is buried in the St. John Cemetery in Sunderland, Ontario.

By the 1851 census, Margaret (77) is living in York with her son John (32) and his wife Mary Ann (26) and their children John (2) and William (1). And in 1861 Margaret is living with daughter Jane and Jane’s husband James St. John in Brock Township.

Margaret died on February 14, 1861 and is buried with her husband in Sunderland.

Older Posts »

© 2010-2017 Jen's Genealogy Pages All Rights Reserved -- Copyright notice by Blog Copyright