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Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week forty-one, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great-great grandmother Faith Collins, daughter of John Colins, was born around 1817, likely in Yorkshire, England.

She married John Henry Hindle on Jun 9, 1838 in the Parish of Brayton, Yorkshire, England.

In around 1839 their first child, Anne, was born. Sometime around 1840, they emigrated to Canada and their family continued to grow. In total, John and Faith had eight daughters and six sons.

The 1851 Canadian census for Chinguacousy, Ontario, finds John (35) and Faith (34) living with Ann (13), John (11), James (9), Faith (7), Hannah (5), Elizabeth (4) and Thomas (2). By the time the 1861 census rolled around Anne was married and gone and the family had grown to include six more children. John (45) and Faith (25?!) are found living with John (21), James (18), Faith (16), Harriet (14), Elizabeth (13), Thomas (11), Henry (10), Margaret (9), William (6), Mary (4), Robert (3), and Sarah (1).

In 1871, the census for Chinguacousy shows John (57) and Pheth (54) living with Thomas (21), Henry (19), Margaret (17), William (15), Mary (13), Robert (12), Sarah (10) and Esther (8). And in 1881, John (60) and Faith (64) are still in Chinguacousy along with Sarah (20), James (34) and Mary (41).

Faith passed away on October 20, 1886 at 69 years of age. The cause of death was listed as congestion of lungs, 6 days.

John ended up emigrating to the United States in the late 1890s and passed away in Amity, De Kalb, Missouri in 1905. He was buried with Faith in Dixon’s Union Cemetery in Brampton, Ontario.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week forty, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great-great grandfather John Henry Hindle was born on 13 Nov 1813 in England. From what I can determine at this point, he was born in Yorkshire or Lancashire. His father was Thomas Hindell. I have no further information on John until his marriage.

He married Faith Collins on Jun 9, 1838 in the Parish of Brayton, Yorkshire, England.

Sometime around 1839 their first child, Anne, was born. And sometime between her birth and the birth of their son John (likely around 1841), they emigrated to Canada. After arriving in Canada they went on to have twelve more children, for a total of 8 daughters and six sons.

The 1851 Canadian census for Chinguacousy, Ontario, finds John (35) and Faith (34) living with Ann (13), John (11), James (9), Faith (7), Hannah (5), Elizabeth (4) and Thomas (2). Ann is shown, along with her parents, as being born in England. All of the other children were born in Canada. The family is living in a one-story frame house.

The 1861 census for Chinguacousy, finds John (45) and Faith (25?!) living with John (21), James (18), Faith (16), Harriet (14), Elizabeth (13), Thomas (11), Henry (10), Margaret (9), William (6), Mary (4), Robert (3), and Sarah (1). In 1871, the census for Chinguacousy shows John (57) and Pheth (54) living with Thomas (21), Henry (19), Margaret (17), William (15), Mary (13), Robert (12), Sarah (10) and Esther (8). John and Thomas are farmers.

In the 1881 Chinguacousy census, John (60) and Faith (64) are shown living with Sarah (20), James (34) and Mary (41). Both John and James are listed as farmers.

Faith passed away on October 20, 1886 at 69 years of age. The cause of death was listed as congestion of lungs, 6 days.

In 1891, the census for Chinguacousy, Ontario shows John (74) as a lodger living with John Ellis (30) and his wife Esther Jane (28). Esther is John’s youngest daughter. Also in the home are John and Esther’s children Frederick (2) and Earnest (7/12). Mary Hindle (14) is living with the family as a ‘domestic’ – I would expect she is Esther’s niece.

In the 1900 US census for Camden, De Kalb, Missouri, John (88) is shown living with his daughter Anne (61) and her husband John Ferguson (71). Also in the home are John and Anne’s widowed son Adam (40) and his two sons John (14) and Arthur (11). The Fergusons emigrated to the United States from Ontario in 1869. John arrived in 1896. John and Adam are both listed as farmers.

John died on 16 Jul 1905 in Amity, DeKalb, Missouri, United States. John’s obituary read:

John Hindle was born in Yorkshire county, England, November 14, 1813 and died at the home of his daughter, Elizabeth Mason in Amity, MO, July 16, 1905 at the age of 91 years, 8 months, 3 days. In 1838 he was married to Faith Collins, who preceeded him to the better world 18 years ago. He emigrated to Canada in 1840 and in 1895 came to live with his daughters in the United States. He was a staunch Methodist and was one of the organizers of the first Methodist class in Peel County, Ontario, Canada. For 58 years he was known to have a family altar, but the exact date of commenement of his Christian life is unknown. He was a man of excellent health, but the clock of time strikes at last and life ends and thus it was with him. His last illness came a few weeks ago and he suffered much. Although he was well cared for by those who love him to the end, it came so peacefully that the exact moment of his departure was unobserved. He leaves 14 children and a large number of grand and great grandchildren to mourn his loss. The funeral services were conducted at the home of his son-in-law, James Mason in the presence of his relatives and friends. Mr. and Mrs. Mason left Monday evening with the remains for interment in Canada.

He was buried in Dixon’s Union Cemetery in Brampton, Ontario.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week thirty-nine, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great grandmother, Sarah Neil, daughter of William and (unknown) Neil was born in Ontario in about 1831.

Sometime between 1851 and 1852, Sarah married William Davey.

The 1861 census shows William (33) and Sarah (31) in Chinguacousy, Ontario. Also at home were James (7), William (5), Samuel (3), and Elizabeth (1).

The 1871 census finds the family in Orangeville, Ontario. William (45), Sarah (40), along with James (17), Edward (15), Samuel (13), Elizabeth (11), Catherine (7), and Andrew (4).

The 1881 census shows William (52) and Sarah (41) still in Orangeville. Elizabeth (20), Catherine (18), Artimissy (15) and Andrew (14) are with them.

The 1891 census finds William (65) and Sarah (60) in Orangeville. Living with them is son Andrew (23), daughter Elizabeth Williams (32) and her daughter Ada Williams (10 months), as well as grandson Edward McKenna (9). This census suggests that though both of Sarah’s parents were born in Ireland, she was born in Ontario.

William died at 70 years of age on September 20, 1896 in Orangeville, Ontario.

By 1901, Sarah (60) is living with her daughter Elizabeth Williams and Elizabeth’s two children Ada (10) and William (4).

In 1911, Sarah (80) is living with her son Andrew (44) and his wife Edith (36), along with their children Charles (9), Norman (6) and Gordon (4).

Sarah died at 88 years of age on February 19, 1918 in Orangeville, Ontario. She had been living at 1054 Dufferin St, with her son Andrew. She had chronic endocarditis but the death registration suggests she died of acute myocarditis.

18
Feb
1918
in
Orangevill

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week thirty-eight, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great grandfather, William Davey, son of William and Elizabeth (unknown) Davey was born sometime around 1828 in Ontario.

The 1851 census finds William (26) at home with his parents William (61) and Elizabeth (62). Both Williams are listed as farmers.

Sometime between 1851 and 1852, William married Sarah Neil (Neal?).

The 1861 census shows William (33) and Sarah (31) in Chinguacousy, Ontario. Also at home were James (7), William (5), Samuel (3), and Elizabeth (1). William is a farmer.

The 1871 census finds the family in Orangeville, Ontario. William (45) and Sarah (40) are there along with James (17), Edward (15), Samuel (13), Elizabeth (11), Catherine (7), and Andrew (4). William, a carpenter, is listed as German, although in previous censuses he is listed as English.

The 1881 census shows William (52) and Sarah (41) still in Orangeville. Elizabeth (20), Catherine (18), Artimissy (15) and Andrew (14) are with them. William is listed as a framer and Dutch. I am not sure where Artimissy was in the 1871 census, since it appears she was older than Andrew.

The 1891 census has William (65) and Sarah (60) in Orangeville. Living with them is son Andrew (23), daughter Elizabeth Williams (32) and her daughter Ada Williams (10 months), as well as grandson Edward McKenna (9). William is a barn framer.

William died at 70 years of age on September 20, 1896 in Orangeville, Ontario. He was listed as a builder and died of pneumonia and heart failure.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week thirty-seven in my attempt to catch up!

My great-great-great grandmother, Ellen Jeffries, was born in about 1834 in England. Her parents were William and, possibly, Ann Jeffries.

I have not been able to conclusively find the family on the 1841 or 1851 censuses. But on November 22, 1857, Ellen married Charles Lusty in St Nicholas Church, Plumstead, following the publication of banns. Twenty-one year old Charles is shown as a bachelor and both he and father John are listed as labourers. Twenty-three year old Ellen is a spinster and her father, William, is a metal refiner.

By the 1861 census, the family is living in Greenwich East, Kent, at 14 Bowater Terrace. Charles (24) and Ellen (26) along with daughter Mary (2) and three-week old son Charles are living with Charles’ parents John (54) and Mary (49). Also still at home are John and Mary’s children, Sarah Ann (15), Louisa (13), Harriet (11), and George (8).

On the 1871 census, the family is found in Croydon, Surrey. Charles (34) and Ellen (35) are living with Mary Elizabeth (12), Charles (7), Ellen Louisa (9), Rebecca (5) and Arthur (1). Charles is shown as an excavator and Ellen is a laundress.

By the 1881 census, the family has moved to 3 Maybank Cottages in Lewisham. Charles (44) and Ellen (45) along with children Charles (18), Rebecca (16) and Arthur (14) are living there. Charles was a brick maker, Ellen was a dress maker, Charles Jr. was a general labourer, Rebecca was a domestic servant and Arthur was an errand boy.

In January 1888, Charles and Ellen sailed from Liverpool to Boston on the SS Lake Ontario. They were heading for Toronto, Ontario, where several of their children had already settled. They are found on the 1891 Canadian census living in St. Paul’s Ward in York East. Charles (60) and Ellen (62) are there, and Charles is listed as a stone cutter.

Ellen died on February 11, 1899. She had been living at 38 Davenport Road in Toronto. The cause of death was ‘probably heart failure following la grippe”. Dr. Richardson was in attendance and the informant was EK Richardson.

Charles died less than a decade later on April 29, 1907.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week thirty-six, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great grandfather, Charles Lusty, was born in 1836 in King’s Stanley, Glouchestershire, England. His parents were John and Mary (Brinkworth) Lusty.

The 1841 English census finds the family in King’s Stanley. John (30) and Mary (25) are there along with John (9), Thomas (7) and Charles (5). John is listed as an agricultural labourer and Mary is a laundress.

The 1851 census finds the family in Cheltenham, Glouchestershire in Cottage H Lane. John (43) and Mary (39) were there along with John (19), Thomas (17) and Charles (14). Along with John, all three sons were listed as all agricultural labourers. Mary was still a laundress. Margaret (9), Elizabeth (7), Sarah (5), Louisa (2) and Harriet (4 months) were also in the home along with Martha Chew (18), a servant, and William Lusty (17), a visitor.

On November 22, 1857, Charles married Ellen Jeffries in Plumstead, Kent, following the publication of banns. They were married in St Nicholas Church. Twenty-one year old Charles is shown as a bachelor and labourer and his father, John, is listed as a labourer. Twenty-three year old Ellen is a spinster and her father, William, is a metal refiner.

By the 1861 census, the family is living in Greenwich East, Kent at 14 Bowater Terrace. John (54) and Mary (49) are in the home along with Charles (24) and Ellen (26) and their daughter Mary (2) and three week old son Charles. Also still at home are Sarah Ann (15), Louisa (13), Harriet (11), and George (8). John is still a labourer, Mary is still a laundress. Charles is now a brickmaker and Ellen is a dressmaker.

By the 1871 census, Charles (34) and Ellen (35) are on their own in Croydon, Surrey. With them are children Mary Elizabeth (12), Charles (7), Ellen Louisa (9), Rebecca (5) and Arthur (1). Charles is listed as an excavator and Ellen is a laundress. The family appears to have moved around frequently, as Mary Elizabeth was born in Woolwich, Kent; Charles in Peckham, Kent; Ellen in Blackheath, Kent, and Rebecca and Arthur in Croydon.

By the 1881 census, the family has moved again, this time to 3 Maybank Cottages in Lewisham. The family consists of Charles (44), Ellen (45) and children Charles (18), Rebecca (16) and Arthur (14). Charles at listed again as a brick maker; Ellen a dress maker. Charles Jr. was a general labourer, Rebecca was a domestic servant and Arthur was an errand boy.

In 1888, Charles and Ellen are found on the passenger list for the SS Lake Ontario, which sailed from Liverpool to Boston in January of that year. They were destined for Toronto, Ontario, where several of their children had already settled. Charles (60) and Ellen (62) are listed on the 1891 Canadian census living in St Paul’s Ward in York East. Charles is a stone cutter.

Ellen died on February 11, 1899.

Charles died on April 29, 1907 of pneumonia at Toronto General Hospital. He lived at 18 Wilton Avenue.

 

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week thirty-five.

My great-great-great grandmother, Charlotte Jackman, was born on October 16, 1837 in Woking, Surrey, England. Her parents were Thomas and Susannah Jackman. She was baptized on November 19, 1837.

The 1841 census finds the family in Rushey Green, Lewisham, Kent. Thomas (40) and Susanna (30) are there along with Susanna (8), Charlotte (3), and Maria (1)

The 1851 census shows Thomas (50) and Susan (40), along with Charlotte (13), Maria (11), Julia (4), Eliza (8) and William (2). The family is living in Rushey Green in Lewisham. Thomas is an agricultural labourer.

Charlotte married John Richardson in the first quarter of 1860. She was his second wife, his first having passed away following the birth of their only daughter.

The 1861 census finds John (46) and Charlotte (23) along with Ann (7) and George T (1). John is a Gardener. He is shown as being born in Hartfield, Sussex.

On the 1871 census, John (50) and Charlotte (33) are shown living at Waterloo Place in Lewisham. John is listed as an agricultural labourer. George (11), Susannah (8) and William (5) are scholars. Thomas (3) and Alfred (1) are too young for school.

On the 1881 census, a widowed Charlotte (44) is living at 4 Maybank Cottages with Susannah (18), William (15),  Alfred (11), Charlotte (8) and Frederick (2). Charlotte is a mangler (laundress). Both Thomas and John passed away sometime between the 1871 and 1881 censuses.

I haven’t been able to find Charlotte on the 1891 census, nor have I found a death record for her. I am not sure if she passed away before the 1891 census or if she remarried.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week thirty-four.

My great-great-great grandfather, John Richardson, was born in 1815 in Hartfield, Sussex, England. His parents were Richard and Sarah Richardson and he was baptized on September 3, 1815.

Sometime prior to 1851, John married Ann (last name unknown). I have yet to find a marriage record for them, however, by the 1851 census the couple were living in Wateringbury, Kent. John (34) was an agricultural labourer and Ann (32) was a house servant.

In 1854, Ann gave birth to a daughter, also named Ann. Sometime in the late 1850s Ann Sr., passed away.

At the beginning at 1860, John married Charlotte Jackman. By the 1861 census John (46) and Charlotte (23) are living in Lewisham, Kent, at 8 Waterloo Place, along with Ann (7) and George T (1). John is gardener (jobbing), which seems to suggest he moved around from job to job.

On the 1871 census, John (50) and Charlotte (33) are still at Waterloo Place. John is listed as an agricultural labourer. George (11), Susannah (8) and William (5) are scholars. Thomas (3) and Alfred (1) are too young for school.

John does not appear on the 1881 census and daughter Susannah’s 1882 marriage record states that her father was deceased. The 1881 census shows John’s widow Charlotte with a two year old, which suggests John died between 1878 and 1881, but I have yet to find conclusive evidence.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week thirty-three.

My great-great-great grandmother, Jane Adams, was born in 1817 in Basingstoke, Hampshire, England. Her parents were William and Sarah Adams. She was baptized on August 1, 1817 in Basingstoke.

Jane married Cornelius Oakley on October 7, 1837 in Southampton.

The 1841 English census finds the family living in Southampton. Cornelius (25) and Jane (24) are there along with William (2) and Cornelius (1). Also in the home is Elizabeth Oakley (57), presumably Cornelius’ mother. Ann Edwards (60) is shown as head of household.

By the 1851 census, the family has moved to 29 Crown Gardens in Brighton. Cornelius (35) and Jane (33) are there with William (12), Cornelius (10), Alfred (8), Sarah (5), Samuel (3), and George (1 month). Also in the home are visitors Henry Goodborn (17) and William Baker (19).

By the 1861 census, the family was back in Southampton. Cornelius (45) and Jane (43) are at home with Cornelius (20), Alfred (16), Samuel (13), George (11), Thomas (8), Alice (4), and Emma (4 months). The family was away from Southampton from the late 1840s until the late 1850s, not more than 10 years in total.

The family emigrated to Canada in 1870, arriving in Quebec City on board the Ganges on July 13, 1870. Travelling with Cornelius and Jane were Alice, Emma, Thomas and Edward Pardoe Coulman. Alfred and his wife and their two children were also on that voyage. By the 1871 Canadian census, the family is found in St Antoine Ward in Montreal West. Cornelius (55) and Jane (53) are there along with Thomas (17), Alice (15), and Emma (10). Also with the family is Emily (26) and Albert (4), Frederick (2) and Sarah (4 months). Emily is shown as married, though I don’t know where her husband Alfred was at the time of the census.

Sometime prior to the 1881 census, the family moved to Ontario. Cornelius (66), Jane (65) and Emma (20) are living in St. Stephen’s Ward in Toronto. A number of their grown children are living on the same street.

Cornelius passed away on September 1, 1886 at 70 years of age from dyspepsis. Jane passed away on January 5, 1887 of chronic pneumonia.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week thirty-two.

My great-great-great grandfather, Cornelius Oakley, was born about 1815 in Southampton, Hampshire, England. His parents were John Oakley and Elizabeth Taplin. He was baptized on January 7, 1816 in St. Mary’s in Southampton.

Cornelius married Jane Adams on October 7, 1837 in Southampton.

The 1841 English census finds the family living in Southampton. Cornelius (25) and Jane (24) are there along with William (2) and Cornelius (1). Also in the home is Elizabeth Oakley (57), presumably Cornelius’ mother. Ann Edwards (60) is shown as head of household – I am not sure how she is connected to the family.

By the 1851 census, the family has expanded and moved to 29 Crown Gardens in Brighton. Cornelius (35) and Jane (33) are shown with William (12), Cornelius (10), Alfred (8), Sarah (5), Samuel (3), and George (1 month). Also in the home are Henry Goodborn (17) and William Baker (19), they are both listed as visitors and both are carpenters. Cornelius is a stone mason.

By the 1861 census, the family was back in Southampton, in the parish of St. Mary’s Extra. Cornelius (45) and Jane (43) are at home with Cornelius (20), Alfred (16), Samuel (13), George (11), Thomas (8), Alice (4), and Emma (4 months). Cornelius and his sons Cornelius and Alfred are all listed as stone masons. From the birthplaces of the various children, it appears the family was away from Southampton from the late 1840s until the late 1850s, not more than 10 years in total.

By 1870, however, the family moved much further away than just up the coast of England. They arrived in Quebec City on July 13, 1870 on board the Ganges. Cornelius was listed as a stone mason and traveled with 3 adult males, 2 adult females and one child. Travelling with Cornelius and Jane were Alice, Emma, Thomas and Edward Pardoe Coulman (listed as a son, he would eventually marry Alice). Alfred and his wife and their two children were also on that voyage. Their other sons William, Cornelius, George and Samuel would immigrate (and some return to England) at other times.

The Ganges trip was connected with the East-End Emigration Club, which helped to sponsor emigrants to the “new world”. There were 761 emigrants who set off on that ship. Some of them were sponsored by Kelsall’s Emigration Charity, which supplied a suit of clothing as well as a modest sum of money to help the immigrants get off to a good start. The Oakley’s appear to have been affiliated with “Mr Currie’s Club”. The records state they had $13.75 to help them start off in Canada – apparently supplied by themselves – and they were heading for Montreal.

And, in fact, the 1871 Canadian census shows the family living in St Antoine Ward in Montreal West. Cornelius (55) and Jane (53) are there along with Thomas (17), Alice (15), and Emma (10). Also with the family is Emily (26) and Albert (4), Frederick (2) and Sarah (4 months). Emily is shown as married and I would assume her husband is Alfred, but I don’t know where he was at the time of the census.

Sometime prior to the 1881 census, the family has moved to Ontario. Cornelius (66), Jane (65) and Emma (20) are living in St. Stephen’s Ward in Toronto. A number of their grown children are living on the same street. Cornelius Oakley Jr and his wife Frances are there with their children, William, Albert, Elizabeth, Frank, Harry and Nelly. George and his wife Mary Ann are living with Charles, Emma, George and Cornelius. Also living with them are George’s sister Alice, her husband Edward Coulman, and their son James. Thomas and his wife Anne are also neighbours, along with their children Anne, Alice and Thomas. Alfred and Emily are also just a couple of doors away, along with Alfred, Jane, Sarah, Annie, Frederick and Richard.

Cornelius passed away on September 1, 1886, at 70 years of age from dyspepsis. He was listed as a stone cutter.

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