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Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week fifty-two – just in the nick of time!

My great-great-great-great grandfather Thomas Burton was born in about 1786 to Thomas and Elizabeth (Sendall) Burton.

He married Alice Maria Hardy, daughter of James and Eleanor (Le Bas) Hardy, who was born about 1782. They were married on May 25, 1813 in Norfolk.

Their children included Thomas (born 1816), Emily (1816), Harriet Elizabeth (1822), William (1824), Alfred (1825), and Ann Mary (1829).

The 1841 census finds Alice (55) at home, along with Thomas (25), William (17), Emily (25), Harriett (19), and Ann (12). They are living at Langley Grange in Norfolk and Thomas appears to be away visiting in London. Also in the home are four servants.

The 1851 census finds Thomas (64) and Alice (65) still at the Langley Grange. Thomas is a a farmer of 540 acres employing 20 labourers and 5 boys. The children still at home include William (36) and Ann Mary (21). Also in the household is Harriet Cross (10), a visitor; servant Mary Ann Wright; servant Eleanor Whiting; and groom William Smith.

The 1861 census finds Thomas (75) and Alice (77)  at the Grange. Thomas was a farmer of 450 acres employing a number of men and boys. Also at home was Annie (30). The family employed several servants including, Susan Bickers (house servant), Harriet Day (dairymaid), and Richard Alexander (groom).

Thomas died on August 10, 1867.

The 1871 census found Alice (89) living alone with a housekeeper, Ann Futbrice (sp?) in Heigham, Norwich. Alice died on October 12, 1874.

 

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week fifty-one, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great-great grandmother was Sarah Bohle. Sarah was born around 1795 to David and Elizabeth Bohle.

She married Richard Salter on January 16, 1814 in Montreal’s Anglican Christ Church Cathedral. Sarah and Richard had at least twelve children: David, Jane, Rosanna, William Richard, Elizabeth, Pricilla, John, Peter, Frederick, Richard, Francis and Henry.

Richard died in June of 1847. Sarah followed just a few months later, passing away on November 1, 1847.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week fifty, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great-great grandfather was Richard Salter. I don’t have any information at this point about his parents or where he was born. My current belief is that he was born in England in approximately 1782 and came to Canada as part of the 49th Regiment around the time of the War of 1812.

He married Sarah Bohle on January 16, 1814 in Montreal’s Anglican Christ Church Cathedral. He was then a sergeant in the 49th Regiment. They were both of the age of majority.

I know of several children born to Richard and Sarah, including David (born 1815), Jane (born 1817), Rosanna (born 1819), William Richard (born 1821), Elizabeth (born 1823), Pricilla (born 1824), John (born 1825), Peter (born 1828), Frederick (born 1830), Richard (born 1832), Francis (born 1834) and Henry (born 1837).

Most of the baptism records for the children indicate that Richard was the Barrack Sergeant for the Montreal Garrison.

Richard died in 1847:

Richard Salter late barrack sergeant in the Garrison of Montreal died on the thirteenth day of June one thousand eight hundred and forty seven aged sixty five years and was buried on the sixteenth immediately following…

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week forty-nine, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great-great grandfather was Robert Williams. He was born in Ireland, likely in the late 1780s. He married Elizabeth Hamilton around 1808.

They emigrated to Canada in the early 1820s and settled in the Ormstown, Quebec area.

According to a Deed of Donation, as indexed, from  April 18, 1831, the family had several children:

Robert Williams & his wife Elizabeth Hamilton; their minor children Isabella, Sarah, James, William, Elizabeth, Charlotte, Mary , Hamilton, Robert Alexander & Andrew; their son Thomas of age of majority.

I don’t have a great deal more solid information on the family at this point – I’m not even entirely positive when Robert and Elizabeth died.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week forty-eight, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great-great grandmother was Agnes Doan. She was born on October 6, 1799, in Solebury, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, United States. Her parents were Mahlon and Rebecca (Hartley) Doan.

The family moved north to Upper Canada in 1808, ultimately settling in East Gwillimbury. They were Quakers and the Buckingham Monthly Meeting of Friends provided a certificate to the Yonge Street Monthly Meeting attesting to the family’s worth:

To the Monthly Meeting of Friends held at Yonge Street in Upper Canada
Mahlon Doan & Rebeckah his wife being about to remove and settle within the limits of your meeting have requested our Certificate in order to join in membership with you. They have been in a good degree orderly in their lives and conversation and diligent in attending our Religious meetings and on enquiry no other appears but they have settled their affairs to satisfaction Therefore we recommend them with their six minor children to wit (Anna, James Hartley, Agness, Johnathan, Rebeccah & Elizabeth Balderston) to your Christian care desiring their preservation in the truth and subscribe ourselves your friends. From the Monthly Meeting of Friends held at Buckingham, Bucks County, state of Pennsylvania the 4th day of the 4th month, 1808.

Agnes married Harrison Haight around 1817. They had several children including Melissa, Silas, Mahlon, Samuel, Joseph, Betsy, Sophronia and Susan. In 1834, the couple became one of the first families to settle in what eventually became Little Britain, Ontario.

Agnes passed away in September 1842.

 

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week forty-seven, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great-great grandfather was Harrison Haight. He was born sometime around 1797 in the United States, likely in New York. By the time he married Agnes Doan around 1817 he had moved north to Ontario, possibly with his parents.

In 1834, Harrison and Agnes settled in Little Britain, Ontario. According to the Church Centennial, Little Britain, 1839-1939:

Harrison Haight, Jr. was closely associated with the early development of Little Britain. He is described as being a muscular and physically powerful man, well over six feet tall, and was thus well fitted for the rigours of life in a stern, new land. A keen intellect and high moral purpose also combined in him to produce a settler of value to the early community.
The Indians found in Harrison Haight a trusted friend. They would talk to him when they would not say a word to others. His home was always open to them and they entered without knocking. A locked door made them suspicious.

Harrison and Agnes had several children. As far as I have been able to determine so far these children include, Melissa, Silas, Mahlon, Samuel, Joseph, Betsy, Sophronia and Susan. Agnes passed away in 1842.

A family legend told to me by my great aunts suggests that somewhere in the early 1840s, Harrison became convinced the world was going to end. At that time he gave away many of his farming implements, put on his best night clothes and climbed to the roof of his house to await the end. The following morning, obviously, he had to climb back down and attempt to retrieve his goods. I’m sure I’ll never be able to prove this story – but it has always intrigued me!

Following Agnes’ death, Harrison married Elizabeth McKinley on November 28, 1844, in Darlington, Ontario.

The 1861 census finds Harrison (64) and Elizabeth (57) in Reach, Ontario. And in the 1871 census, Harrison (74) and Elizabeth (68), they are still there.

The 1881 census for Minto, Ontario, finds Harrison (84) with his son Joseph (47) and his wife Moriah (47) and their children Reuben Thomas (24), John Harrison (22), Joseph (20), and Stephen (17).  Elizabeth (84) appears to be living with a Robert Horner (78) in Scugog, Ontario. Robert is possibly her brother.

I am not entirely certain when Harrison died.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week forty-six, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great-great grandfather was Nicholas Thomas. He was born sometime around 1770, likely in Cornwall, England.

Pallot’s Marriage Index for England shows Nicholas Thomas marrying Elizabeth Philipps in 1799. They had several children – I know of Reuben, Sarah, John, Ann, Elizabeth, William, Luke, Mary, Jane, and Nicholas.

The 1841 census shows Nicholas (70) and Elizabeth (60) living in Luxulyan, Cornwall with their children still at home, Luke (25), Nicholas (20) and Susan (14). Nicholas was a farmer.

He died in 1848. I have yet to determine when Elizabeth died.

 

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week forty-five, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

I know very little about my great-great-great-great grandmother Margaret Glover. She was born in Ireland in 1774, but I don’t know who her parents were.

She married John Lloyd around 1798. After their marriage and the birth of their nine children (Caleb, Eliza, Glover, Marmaduke, Maria, Jane, Margaret, John and William), they emigrated to Ontario, Canada, ultimately settling in Brock Township.

John died on August 22, 1848 and is buried in the St. John Cemetery in Sunderland, Ontario.

By the 1851 census, Margaret (77) is living in York with her son John (32) and his wife Mary Ann (26) and their children John (2) and William (1). And in 1861 Margaret is living with daughter Jane and Jane’s husband James St. John in Brock Township.

Margaret died on February 14, 1861 and is buried with her husband in Sunderland.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week forty-four, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

I know very little about my great-great-great-great grandfather John Lloyd. He was born in Ireland in 1774, but I don’t know who his parents were or if he had siblings.

He married Margaret Glover around 1798. At some point after their marriage, they emigrated to Ontario, Canada, ultimately settling in Brock Township, Ontario. To the best of my information, they had nine children: Caleb, Eliza, Glover, Marmaduke, Maria, Jane, Margaret, John and William.

John died on August 22, 1848 and is buried in the St. John Cemetery in Sunderland, Ontario.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week forty-three, in my attempt to catch up before the end of the year!

My great-great-great-great grandmother Ann Nancy Baker was born in 1792 in Co. Limerick, Ireland.

She married Philip St. John on May 7, 1811. They emigrated to New York and, shortly after arriving there, journeyed onward to settle permanently in Upper Canada. The family at the time of emigration consisted of two sons, James and George, and daughter, Eliza.

Once they were settled in Brock Township, several more children were born to the couple – Philip, William, Adam, Mary, Margaret, Phoebe, Jane and Julius. By 1851, all their children are grown and gone except for Julius (15). The 1861 census finds Philip (70) and Nancy A (69) living with Julius (24) and his wife Martha (26) and their son Philip (1).

Philip (80) and Ann (79) were still living with Julius (34) and his wife Martha (38) and their children Philip (10), Annie (8), Emma (3) and Martha (1) in the 1871 census. Philip passed away on December 13, 1874. He was followed by Ann on October 4, 1880. Ann’s cause of death was listed as old age. The were both buried in the St. John Cemetery in Sunderland, Ontario.

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