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Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week thirty-three.

My great-great-great grandmother, Jane Adams, was born in 1817 in Basingstoke, Hampshire, England. Her parents were William and Sarah Adams. She was baptized on August 1, 1817 in Basingstoke.

Jane married Cornelius Oakley on October 7, 1837 in Southampton.

The 1841 English census finds the family living in Southampton. Cornelius (25) and Jane (24) are there along with William (2) and Cornelius (1). Also in the home is Elizabeth Oakley (57), presumably Cornelius’ mother. Ann Edwards (60) is shown as head of household.

By the 1851 census, the family has moved to 29 Crown Gardens in Brighton. Cornelius (35) and Jane (33) are there with William (12), Cornelius (10), Alfred (8), Sarah (5), Samuel (3), and George (1 month). Also in the home are visitors Henry Goodborn (17) and William Baker (19).

By the 1861 census, the family was back in Southampton. Cornelius (45) and Jane (43) are at home with Cornelius (20), Alfred (16), Samuel (13), George (11), Thomas (8), Alice (4), and Emma (4 months). The family was away from Southampton from the late 1840s until the late 1850s, not more than 10 years in total.

The family emigrated to Canada in 1870, arriving in Quebec City on board the Ganges on July 13, 1870. Travelling with Cornelius and Jane were Alice, Emma, Thomas and Edward Pardoe Coulman. Alfred and his wife and their two children were also on that voyage. By the 1871 Canadian census, the family is found in St Antoine Ward in Montreal West. Cornelius (55) and Jane (53) are there along with Thomas (17), Alice (15), and Emma (10). Also with the family is Emily (26) and Albert (4), Frederick (2) and Sarah (4 months). Emily is shown as married, though I don’t know where her husband Alfred was at the time of the census.

Sometime prior to the 1881 census, the family moved to Ontario. Cornelius (66), Jane (65) and Emma (20) are living in St. Stephen’s Ward in Toronto. A number of their grown children are living on the same street.

Cornelius passed away on September 1, 1886 at 70 years of age from dyspepsis. Jane passed away on January 5, 1887 of chronic pneumonia.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week thirty-two.

My great-great-great grandfather, Cornelius Oakley, was born about 1815 in Southampton, Hampshire, England. His parents were John Oakley and Elizabeth Taplin. He was baptized on January 7, 1816 in St. Mary’s in Southampton.

Cornelius married Jane Adams on October 7, 1837 in Southampton.

The 1841 English census finds the family living in Southampton. Cornelius (25) and Jane (24) are there along with William (2) and Cornelius (1). Also in the home is Elizabeth Oakley (57), presumably Cornelius’ mother. Ann Edwards (60) is shown as head of household – I am not sure how she is connected to the family.

By the 1851 census, the family has expanded and moved to 29 Crown Gardens in Brighton. Cornelius (35) and Jane (33) are shown with William (12), Cornelius (10), Alfred (8), Sarah (5), Samuel (3), and George (1 month). Also in the home are Henry Goodborn (17) and William Baker (19), they are both listed as visitors and both are carpenters. Cornelius is a stone mason.

By the 1861 census, the family was back in Southampton, in the parish of St. Mary’s Extra. Cornelius (45) and Jane (43) are at home with Cornelius (20), Alfred (16), Samuel (13), George (11), Thomas (8), Alice (4), and Emma (4 months). Cornelius and his sons Cornelius and Alfred are all listed as stone masons. From the birthplaces of the various children, it appears the family was away from Southampton from the late 1840s until the late 1850s, not more than 10 years in total.

By 1870, however, the family moved much further away than just up the coast of England. They arrived in Quebec City on July 13, 1870 on board the Ganges. Cornelius was listed as a stone mason and traveled with 3 adult males, 2 adult females and one child. Travelling with Cornelius and Jane were Alice, Emma, Thomas and Edward Pardoe Coulman (listed as a son, he would eventually marry Alice). Alfred and his wife and their two children were also on that voyage. Their other sons William, Cornelius, George and Samuel would immigrate (and some return to England) at other times.

The Ganges trip was connected with the East-End Emigration Club, which helped to sponsor emigrants to the “new world”. There were 761 emigrants who set off on that ship. Some of them were sponsored by Kelsall’s Emigration Charity, which supplied a suit of clothing as well as a modest sum of money to help the immigrants get off to a good start. The Oakley’s appear to have been affiliated with “Mr Currie’s Club”. The records state they had $13.75 to help them start off in Canada – apparently supplied by themselves – and they were heading for Montreal.

And, in fact, the 1871 Canadian census shows the family living in St Antoine Ward in Montreal West. Cornelius (55) and Jane (53) are there along with Thomas (17), Alice (15), and Emma (10). Also with the family is Emily (26) and Albert (4), Frederick (2) and Sarah (4 months). Emily is shown as married and I would assume her husband is Alfred, but I don’t know where he was at the time of the census.

Sometime prior to the 1881 census, the family has moved to Ontario. Cornelius (66), Jane (65) and Emma (20) are living in St. Stephen’s Ward in Toronto. A number of their grown children are living on the same street. Cornelius Oakley Jr and his wife Frances are there with their children, William, Albert, Elizabeth, Frank, Harry and Nelly. George and his wife Mary Ann are living with Charles, Emma, George and Cornelius. Also living with them are George’s sister Alice, her husband Edward Coulman, and their son James. Thomas and his wife Anne are also neighbours, along with their children Anne, Alice and Thomas. Alfred and Emily are also just a couple of doors away, along with Alfred, Jane, Sarah, Annie, Frederick and Richard.

Cornelius passed away on September 1, 1886, at 70 years of age from dyspepsis. He was listed as a stone cutter.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week thirty-0ne.

My great-great-great grandmother, Mary Ann Pardoe, was born about 1823 in England. Her father, according to her later marriage certificate, was Thomas Pardoe, a brass founder.

On the 1841 census Mary (25) is shown with Thomas (45) and his second wife, Ann (40), along with Samuel (15) and Thomas (12). They are living in Marylebone, St. Pancras Parish.

On August 14, 1843, Mary Ann married James Coulman, in the parish of Paddington in the County of Middlesex, England. They were both living on Praed Street at the time.

By the 1851 census, Marrianna (24/29?) and James (28) are found in  Islington, Middlesex along with Samuel (5) and Emily (1). James is a stone mason.

In 1861 the census shows James (38) and Marian (38) living in Kensington, St Mary Abbott, Middlesex. Samuel passed away between censuses, in 1855. Emily (11), Edward (8), Charles (6), Henry (3), and James (1 month) are the other children.

I have yet to find the family in the 1871 census.

James died in the sinking of the SS Princess Alice in the River Thames on September 3, 1878. His last address is shown as 10 Lawn Terrace, Fulham and Marion (57) is shown on the 1881 census as a widow at that address. She is the head of the household. Emily Catherine (31) is a milliner. Charles (26) is a railway clerk. James (15) is a carpenter apprentice.

Marian passed away on April 8, 1888 from Bright’s disease and Dropsy Bronchitis. Her son Henry J. Coulman was the informant of her death and they both appeared to have been living at 67 Paxton Road in Chiswick.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week thirty.

My great-great-great grandfather, Thomas Burton, was born on May 28, 1816 in Wrenhigham, Co. Norfolk, England. His parents were Thomas Burton Sr. and Alice Maria Hardy.

I don’t know anything about Thomas’ early life at this point, but on March 21, 1848, he married Dionysia Ansted, daughter of John and Dionysia (Northeast) Ansted, in Lambeth, Surrey, England.

On the 22d inst., at St. Michael’s Church, Stockwell, by the Rev. Charles Kemble, Thomas Burton, Jun., Esq., of Thurton, Norfolk, to Dionysia, second daughter of John Ansted, Esq., of Portland-place, Clapham-road.

The 1851 census finds Thomas (34) and Dionysia (23) living in Thurton, Norfolk. They are living in Thurton Hall, along with their children Alice Jane (2) and Thomas Northeast (5 months). Thomas is listed as a farmer of 269 acres, employing 10 labourers and 2 boys. The family also employs Ellen Harvey (cook), Martha Brewer (housemaid), Jemina Bedingfield (nursemaid), James Ecctertorn (groom) and William Brewer (shepherd?).

By 1861, the census shows the family living on Loddon Road, near Thurton Hall. Thomas (45) and Dionysia (33) now have seven children: Alice Jane (12), Thomas Northeast (10), Arthur Henry (8), Edith Emily (6), Clara Dionysia (4), Margaret (2) and Helen (6 months). Helen was a twin but her brother, Clement, passed away as an infant. Thomas is still a farmer with 260 acres, employing 14 men and 2 boys. Also in the family household is a visiting Emily Ansted (Dionysia’s sister). The family employs Maria Green (governess), Maria Thurston (cook), Mary Whines (nurse), Mary Ward (housemaid), Esther Thompson (nurse) and Alfred Buckle (groom).

From what I have been able to determine the newspapers of the day, it appears Thomas’ father had amassed a considerable debt. Both of them worked land owned by the Proctor-Beauchamp Baronetcy. Thomas Sr died in 1867 and the following year, Thomas and Dionysia and their family emigrated to Canada. I am not sure if or how those two pieces of information might be connected, but it does appear possible that they are. The ship’s manifest shows the family consisting of Thomas (52), Dionysia (42) and children Alice Jane (19), Thomas (17), Edith (14), Clara (11), Margaret (10), Helen (8), Clement (6), Leonard (4), Amy (2) and Frederick (4 months). They sailed cabin class on the Thames, embarking in London on September 24, 1868. They arrived in Quebec on October 20.

The family settled in Quebec, showing up on the 1871 Canadian census in Quebec’s Jacques Cartier district, in the Montreal area. The family at that time consists of Thomas (54), Dionysia (43) and their children: Alice Jane (22), Thomas Northeast (20), Arthur Henry (18), Edith (16), Clara Dionysia (14), Margaret (12), Helen (10), Clement William (8), Leonard Decimus (6), [Amy] Ansted (4), Frederick (3) and Charles (10 months). Thomas is listed as a cultivateur (farmer).

At the time of the 1881 census the family was living in Outremont Village, which today is part of Montreal. Thomas (64) and Dionysia (53) were living with those of their children still at home: Clara (24), Helen (20), Amy (15), Frederick (12), Charles (10), Edith (26), Clement (18) and Leonard (16). Thomas is listed as a Gentleman but several of the children were employed.

By the 1891 census, the family is shown living in Montreal. Thomas (75) and Dionysia (63) were home with Charles (21) and Amy (25). Thomas is listed as an ancien fermier (former farmer), while Charles is a plombier (plumber).

Thomas passed away on February 22, 1898 at 82 years of age. Dionysia followed on August 10 of the same year. Thomas and Dionysia are buried together in Montreal’s Mount Royal cemetery, along with their son Clement and daughter Clara.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week twenty-nine.

My great-great-great grandmother Ann Kelly was born around 1821, likely in Ireland.

She married Baptist Johnson in 1846. And by the 1851 census Baptist (30) and Ann (30) are shown living in St. Laurent, Quebec with their children John (5), William (3), Jane (2) and Ann (1). Also with the family is an Isabelle Johnston (20). I expect she is also related to Baptist, perhaps his sister.

I have yet to find the family on the 1861 census but in 1871, Baptiste (50) and Ann (50) are home with their children John (24), William (22), Jane (21), Anny (19), Sara (17), Elizabeth (15) and Joseph (12) in St. Laurent, Quebec.

In 1881, Baptist (64) and Ann (60) are in St. Laurent, along with eldest son John (33) and his wife Alice (31). Also at home is youngest son Joseph (22).

Baptist died in 1883.

In 1891, Ann (70) is living with her youngest son Joseph (32) and his wife Jessie (27) and daughter Lillian (2). It appears there are also a couple of other unrelated people living with them – perhaps labourers? (The census record online is quite blurry and hard to read).

Ann (80) is still living with Joseph (42) and Jessie (37) in the 1901 census, along with their growing family. Lily (12) has been joined by Ida (9), Clifford (6), Gordon (2) and ‘Beby’ (6 mos). Looking at later census data suggests the baby’s name was Gerald.

Ann died in 1902:

Ann Kelly, widow of the late B. Johnson, of ??? Road, in the Parish of St. Laurent in the District of Montreal, in the Province of Quebec, died of congestion of the lungs on the twenty-eighth day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and two and was buried on the thirtieth day of the same month and year in the presence of the undersigned witnesses
Joseph Johnson
John Johnson
Thos. A Mitchell
Officiating Minister

 

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week twenty-eight.

For the longest time I believed my great-great-great grandfather’s name, like his eldest son, was John Johnson. I am increasingly convinced, however, that his name was in fact Baptist(e). As far as I can tell at this point, Baptist was born around 1821, likely in Ireland.

He married Ann(e) Kelly in 1846:

Baptist Johnson, bachelor, & Ann Kelly, spinster, both of Montreal were married by license on the seventh (sp) day of May in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred forty-six.
By me Chas Bancroft

This marriage was solemnized between us in the presence of: Baptist Johnson; Anne Kelly, George Johnson; Sarah Johnston

I am not entirely certain who George and Sarah are, but I did find a marriage record in the same church two years previously that showed George Johnson marrying Sarah Jane Shannon. I assume that George may be Baptist’s brother – particularly since Baptist’s eldest son was named John George.

On the 1851 census, Baptist (30) and Ann (30) are shown living in St. Laurent, Quebec with their children John (5), William (3), Jane (2) and Ann (1). Also with the family is an Isabelle Johnston (20). I expect she is also related to Baptist, perhaps his sister. Baptist, Ann and Isabelle were all born in Ireland, the children were all born in Quebec.

I have yet to find the family on the 1861 census but in 1871, Baptiste (50) and Ann (50) are home with their children John (24), William (22), Jane (21), Anny (19), Sara (17), Elizabeth (15) and Joseph (12) in St. Laurent.

In 1881, Baptist (64) and Ann (60) are in St. Laurent, along with eldest son John (33) and his wife Alice (31). Also at home is youngest son Joseph (22).

Baptist died in 1883:

Baptist Johnson of St Laurent, in the district of Montreal, died on the 30th day of July, one thousand eight hundred and eighty three and was buried on the first day of August of the same year in the presence of  the undersigned witnesses
Thomas Cumming (sp)
Officiating Minister
J Johnson
D Millar

J Johnson is likely his eldest son John.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week twenty-seven.

My great-great-great grandmother, Maria Knight, was born sometime around 1823 in Montreal. I have found a record for a Mary Knight born on September 5, 1821 to William and Helen Knight, but I am not yet sure if it’s the same Maria.

On April 30, 1838, Maria Knight married David Salter:

David Salter of Montreal, tinsmith, and Maria Knight also of Montreal were after publication of Banns united in Holy matrimony on the thirtieth day of April in the year of our Lord on thousand eight hundred and thirty eight in the presence of the subscribing witnesses by me,
E Botterell, minister.

By the 1850 US census, finds David (32), Maria (26) along with Jane (8), Henrietta (4) and William (2), living in Rensselaer, NY. They are living with two other families and David is a tinsmith. The census states the family is from England. What the census doesn’t show are the three young children – Richard, Sarah and Louisa – who died between 1842 and 1846.

On the 1855 New York census, David (40) and Maria (34), along with Jane (12), Henrietta (9), William (7) and Charles (3), are found in Troy City, Ward 1, in Rensselaer. David is a coppersmith and the family is noted to have been living in Rensselaer for seven years, which would suggest an arrival date of around 1848.

By the 1861 census the family is back in Canada. David (46) and Maria (39) are shown along with their children Jane (18), Henrietta (15), William (12), and Charles (9).

The family moved around fairly frequently. City directories from 1864, 1865 and 1873 show them living at 132 George Street. And the 1871 census finds the family there: David Salter (56), a tinsmith, along with Maria (48). William (23) is now a printer and Charles (18) is a jeweller. Also at home are Jane (26) and Henrietta (24). By 1877, city directories show the family at 15 Mayor Street.

Maria Knight died on August 6, 1879.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week twenty-six.

My great-great-great grandmother, Charlotte Williams, was born around 1825 in Ireland. Her parents were Robert Williams and Elizabeth Hamilton.

I have not yet determined when exactly the family moved from Ireland to Canada but Charlotte married Thomas Fee on December 5, 1844 in the Protestant Episcopal Church in Ormstown, QC.

By the 1851 census, Thomas (35) and Charlotte (32) are living in St. Malachie, QC. Thomas is listed as an Inn-keeper. Their children are John (7), Robert (5), Thomas (3), and William Reid (1).

The 1861 census finds the family still in St. Malachie but Thomas (40) now is listed as a Trader. Also living with Charlotte (40) and Thomas are their children John (16), Robert (14), William (10), Sarah (8), Charlotte (5) and Maria (1). They live in a frame house.

Somewhere between the 1861 census and 1871 census, the family moved to Montreal. They are found on the 1871 census living in Ste Anne Ward, Montreal. Thomas (53) and Charlotte (50) are living with John (24), Robert (22), William (17), Sarah (15), Andrew (13), Charlotte (11), and Maria (9).

Charlotte passed away in 1876. Her record of burial states

 July 7th, 1876

Charlotte Fee wife of Thomas Fee departed this life on the fifth day of July in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy-six and was interred by me on this the seventh day of the same month and year.

J. T. Pitcher (sp?)

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week twenty-five.

My great-great-great grandmother, Elizabeth Humphreys, was born around 1820 in, we believe, Lisnarick, Co. Fermanagh, Ireland. I know nothing beyond her early years beyond that.

Elizabeth married Christopher Summerville around 1840 in Ireland.

They emigrated to Canada in 1846, just as the potato famine was taking hold in Ireland. The records of James Allison, Emigrant agent at Montreal, show the family arriving June 19, 1846, on a “List of destitute emigrants forwarded to Montreal per steamer ‘Montreal’.” Christopher and Elizabeth were travelling with their children John (about 5), Annie (about 3) and Jane (under a year). Sadly, little Jane passed away the following month, on July 26, 1846.

By 1851, the family had settled in East Gwillimbury, York County, Ontario. The census shows Christopher (32), Elizabeth (33), John (10), Ann (8), Hugh (3), and Jane (1). Christopher is listed as a labourer and the family is living in a one-story frame house.

In 1861, the family is still in East Gwillimbury, but their house has grown to two stories. Christopher (42) and Elizabeth (43) are living there with Ann (17), Hugh (12), Jane (10), Elizabeth (6), Christopher (4), and Mary (3). Christopher is listed as a labourer while Hugh and Jane are in school.

By 1871, Christopher (50) and Elizabeth (52) are home with Jane (20), Christopher (14) and Mary (13). Christopher is a labourer and Jane is a seamstress. Christopher and Mary are attending school. The census also shows that Elizabeth was illiterate.

In 1881, the family continues to live in East Gwillimbury. Christopher (60) and Elizabeth (59) are home with Christopher (24) and Mary (23). Christopher Sr. continues to be a labourer while Christopher Jr is a carriage maker.

Christopher Jr. passed away in 1884. Mary passed away at the beginning of 1886. Elizabeth herself passed away on November 3, 1886 of a liver abscess. She is buried in the Sharon Burying Ground.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week twenty-four.

My great-great-great grandfather Christopher Summerville was born in April 1822 in Irvinestown, Co. Fermanagh, Ireland to James and Jane (unknown) Somerville. Family legend suggests Christopher had five brothers – two went to Australia, one went to California, and two came to Ontario. I have not yet attempted to trace the other four – maybe someday!

He married Elizabeth Humphreys sometime around 1840, while they were still in Ireland.

They emigrated to Canada in 1846, as the potato famine was taking hold in Ireland. The records of James Allison, Emigrant agent at Montreal, show the family on June 19, 1846, on a “List of destitute emigrants forwarded to Montreal per steamer ‘Montreal’.” They are shown with a final destination of Toronto. The ‘family’ includes an adult male and an adult female, two children between the ages of 3 and 12 and a ‘free’. This would be Christopher and Elizabeth and their children John (about 5), Annie (about 3) and Jane (under a year).

Jane passed away the following month, on July 26, 1846. We had always believed she had died at sea, but it appears that she survived the voyage but not far beyond it.

By 1851, the family has settled in East Gwillimbury, York County, Ontario. The census shows Christopher (32), Elizabeth (33), John (10), Ann (8), Hugh (3), and Jane (1). Jane was named after her deceased sister. Christopher is listed as a labourer and the family is living in a one-story frame house.

In 1861, the family is still in East Gwillimbury, but their house is now a two-story frame, which suggests they have settled in well to life in Canada. Christopher (42) and Elizabeth (43) are living there with Ann (17), Hugh (12), Jane (10), Elizabeth (6), Christopher (4), and Mary (3). Christopher is listed as a labourer while Hugh and Jane are in school.

By 1871, Christopher (50) and Elizabeth (52) are home with Jane (20), Christopher (14) and Mary (13). Christopher is a labourer and Jane is now a seamstress. Christopher and Mary are attending school, but this is the first census where it is clearly indicated that Christopher cannot write and Elizabeth is unable to read or write.

In 1881, the family continues to live in East Gwillimbury. Christopher (60) and Elizabeth (59) are home with Christopher (24) and Mary (23). Christopher Sr. is still a labourer while Christopher Jr is a carriage maker.

The 1880s were not kind to the family. Christopher Jr. passed away in 1884 and Mary passed away at the beginning of 1886, followed by Elizabeth on November 3 of that year.

On July 2, 1887, Christopher remarried. The marriage records for the County of Simcoe, division of Bradford, show Christopher Somerville (son of James and Jane Somerville) of Irish descent marrying Sarah Pearsall (daughter of Robert and Sarah Pearsall). Sarah was 24 years old to Christopher’s 60.

By the 1891 census, Christopher (68) is show living with Sarah (27) and Albert (2). He is still a labourer. It looks like he may have been known as Christy, if that census is to be believed.

Christopher passed away on March 31, 1901. Although he was not a member of the Children of Peace, he was buried in their Sharon Burying Ground along with Elizabeth.

The 1901 census shows his widow, Sarah (36), living with Albert (12) and, I believe, her sister Mary Pearsall (28) who is shown as a lodger. They are now in the village of Sharon in the Township of East Gwillimbury.

At this point, I yet to determine what happened to Sarah and Albert following the 1901 census.

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