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Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week nineteen.

My great-great-great grandmother Jane Lloyd was born in 1813 in Ireland. Her parents were John and Margaret (Glover) Lloyd and Jane was one of nine children.

Jane married James St. John on April 17, 1833 in Brock Township, Ontario.

By the 1851 census, the family had grown. Living in a one-and-a-half story stone house, Jane (38) and James (39) were at home with Philip (18), John (17), Margaret Ann (15), James (13), Maria (11), Eliza (9), Rebecca (7), Mary (5), Catherine (3), and William (1).

The 1861 census shows the family living in a two-story stone house in Brock Township. Jane (48) and James (49) are there with John (26), James (21), Mariah (19), Eliza (17), Mary (13), Catherine (11), William (9), Wesley (6), and Rebecca (4).

Jane passed away on April 19, 1864. James outlived her by decades, passing away in April 1904, at 92 years of age. They are both buried in the St. John Cemetery in Sunderland, Ontario.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week eighteen.

My great-great-great grandfather James St. John was born on February 25, 1812 in Rathkeale, County Limerick, Ireland. His parents were Philip and Nancy Ann (Baker) St. John. James was the eldest of eleven children.

The family emigrated to Canada, via New York, in 1817. My understanding is that his parents went on ahead and James came along with extended family later.

James married Jane Lloyd on April 17, 1833 in Brock Township, Ontario.

By the 1851 census, the family had grown. Living in a one-and-a-half story stone house, James (39) and Jane (38) were at home with Philip (18), John (17), Margaret Ann (15), James (13), Maria (11), Eliza (9), Rebecca (7), Mary (5), Catherine (3), and William (1). Also in the home was a 16-year-old Eliza Graham but I am not sure how she was connected to the family.

The 1861 census shows the family living in a two-story stone house in Brock Township. James (49) and Jane (48) are there with John (26), James (21), Mariah (19), Eliza (17), Mary (13), Catherine (11), William (9), Wesley (6), and Rebecca (4). Philip and Margaret Ann have likely married and moved out. The elder Rebecca passed away just before the younger Rebecca was born.

Jane herself passed away on April 19, 1864.

The 1871 census shows James (58) at home with Eliza (26), Mary (23), Catherine (21), William (19), Joseph (16), and Rebecca (13). Also with the family is a George St. John (37) and a Michael McCarthy (14). I am not sure precisely how they are connected, although George is somehow related.

The 1881 census, shows James (68) at home with Eliza (36) and Wesley (26).

On both the 1891 and 1901 censuses, James is living with his second youngest son William and William’s family.

James passed away from peritonitis on April 9, 1904, at 92 years of age.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week seventeen.

My great-great grandmother Margaret Hindle was born on October 14, 1853 in Chinguacousy, Ontario. Her parents were John Henry and Faith (Collins) Hindle, originally from Yorkshire, England. Margaret was one of fourteen children born to John and Faith.

The 1861 census finds the family in Chinguacousy. John (45) and Faith (45) are there along with John (21), James (18), Faith (16), Harriet (14), Elizabeth (13), Thomas (11), Henry (10), Margaret (9), William (6), Mary (4), Robert (3), and Sarah (1). Already out of the family home was eldest sister Anne, who had married a couple of years previously.

In 1871, John (57) and Faith (54) are home with Thomas (21), Henry (19), Margaret (17), William (15), Mary (13), Robert (12), Sarah (10) and Easther (8).

Margaret Hindle married James Davey in 1875 in Brampton, Peel County, ON. The exact date is not clear from the marriage registration but is probably July 15.

By the 1881 census, James (27) and Margaret (27) are living in Chinguacousy with their children William (5), John (3) and Edward (1).

The 1891 census shows James (37) and Margaret (37) with their children: William (15), John (13), Edward (11), Margaret (9), Samuel (7), Sarah (5), and Thomas (3).

I couldn’t find the family in the 1901 census in Canada. After a lot of digging, they turned up on the 1900 US census for Clinton Township, Macomb County, Michigan. That census shows James (46) and Margaret (46) along with their children: Samuel (16), Sarah (14), Andrew (8), Robert (7) and Alexander (4). James is a day labourer. The family had just arrived in the States at the time of the census.

By the 1911 census, the family is back in Canada. According to the census, the Davey farm was located on Lot 6, Concession 4 in Chinguacousy. James’ (56) occupation is listed as ‘Odd Jobs.’ Margaret (57) is also there along with Andrew (21), Robert (18), Alexander (15),  and Ethel (11). It appears that their son John (34) and his family are living with them.

On the 1921 census, James (67) and Margaret (67) are found at home in Chinguacousy with Ethel (21) and Louise (9). Also with the family is James Neal (27), a labourer. At this time, I’m not sure how precisely Louise and James are connected to the family. James Davey’s mother was a Neal so James Neal is probably family, but I’m not sure what the relationship might be.

James died on February 22, 1925, at 71 years of age. Margaret followed him on October 11, 1931 at 76 years of age of what appears to be listed as ‘acute indigestion.’

 

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week sixteen.

My great-great grandmother Hannah Dool was, according to the 1901 census, born in January 1823 in Ireland. Her death registration shows that she was born in January 1820. I haven’t yet determined exactly where (although, as with her husband Robert Hunter, the County Antrim/Belfast area seems likely). And I have no additional information about her family – parents or siblings.

I do know she married Robert Hunter sometime around 1840 while still in Ireland. They emigrated to Canada shortly thereafter.

The 1851 Canadian census finds Robert (35) and Hannah (29) living in Chinguacousy, Peel County, Ontario. Their children at that time included James (11) and Thomas (9). The census says they were both born in Ireland. Robert (8), William (6), John (4) and Joseph (2) were all born in Canada. This suggests the family emigrated somewhere around 1842.

Since last week, I managed to finally locate at least part of the family on the 1861 census. Robert (50) and Hannah (39) are show in Chinguacousy with John (13), Joseph (11) and Alexander (9). I have yet to determine where James, Thomas, Robert and William are. Given that they would be between 16 and 21 at the time, I expect that they might be out working elsewhere.

By 1871, however, all four eldest boys are back home again with their parents in Chinguacousy Township. Robert (55) and Hannah (48) are home with James (30), Thomas (28), Robert (26), William (24), John (22), Joseph (19), Alexander (17), Henry (16), Hugh (7) and Jacob (5), along with sisters Mary (14), Jane (11) and Hannah (9). Of the fourteen children I am aware of that were born to Robert and Hannah, only one (Issac, Jacob’s twin) died in early childhood.

By 1881, Robert (60) and Hannah (57) are still in Chinguacousy with William (31), Jane (22), Hannah (19), Hugh (17) and Jacob (15).

Robert passed away on May 29, 1888. Consequently, the 1891 census shows a widowed Hannah (70) with just Hugh (26) and Jacob (24) at home.

In 1901, Jacob (35) is showing as the head of household. His mother, Hannah (77), is living with him.

On October 22, 1908, at 88 years old, Hannah passed away from ‘senile decay’.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week fifteen.

My great-great grandfather Robert Hunter was born around 1821 in Ireland. I haven’t yet determined exactly where in Ireland (although rumour has that it was the County Antrim/Belfast area). I don’t know exactly when he was born, nor who his parents were, nor if he had siblings! Obviously I still have much work to do.

However, I do know he married Hannah Dool sometime around 1840 while they were still in Ireland. They emigrated to Canada shortly thereafter.

The 1851 Canadian census finds Robert (35) and Hannah (29) living in Chinguacousy, Peel County, Ontario. Robert is a weaver. At that time, their children included James (11) and Thomas (9). The census says they were both born in Ireland. Robert (8), William (6), John (4) and Joseph (2) were all born in Canada. This suggests the family emigrated somewhere around 1842.

I have yet to find the family on the 1861 census but by 1871, they have grown in number. They are still in Chinguacousy Township but now at home with Robert (55) and Hannah (48) are James (30), Thomas (28), Robert (26), William (24), John (22), Joseph (19), Alexander (17), Henry (16), Hugh (7) and Jacob (5), along with sisters Mary (14), Jane (11) and Hannah (9). Of the fourteen children born to Robert and Hannah, only one (Issac, Jacob’s twin) died in infancy. Robert is still a weaver but all the boys old enough to be working are listed as labourers, except for Joseph who is a telegraph operator.

By 1881, Robert (60) and Hannah (57) are still in Chinguacousy with William (31), Jane (22), Hannah (19), Hugh (17) and Jacob (15). Robert is now listed as a farmer, as is William.

Robert passed away on May 29, 1888 of Bright’s disease. My understanding is that he is buried in Mayfield United Church cemetery.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week fourteen.

My great-great grandmother Rebecca Lusty was born in February 1866 to Ellen and Charles Lusty. The family was living in Croyden, Surrey, England at the time of her birth. She was the fourth of five children.

On the 1871 census, the family is found in Croydon. Charles (34) and Ellen (35) are living with Mary Elizabeth (12), Charles (7), Ellen Louisa (9), Rebecca (5) and Arthur (1). Charles is shown as an excavator and Ellen is a laundress.

By the 1881 census, the family has moved to 3 Maybank Cottages in Lewisham. The family consisted of Charles (44), Ellen (45) and children Charles (18), Rebecca (16) and Arthur (14). Charles at this time was a brick maker, Ellen was a dress maker, Charles Jr. was a general labourer, Rebecca was a domestic servant and Arthur was an errand boy.

Next door to the Lustys lived Charlotte Richardson and her children Susannah, William, Alfred, Charlotte and Frederick. In November 1882, Rebecca and William were married.

Soon after that, in January 1883, William and Rebecca welcomed their first child, daughter Rebecca Alice. She was the first of what would eventually be 10 children.

The family emigrated to Canada in 1887 and by 1891, William (26) and Rebecca (25) were living in St. Paul’s Ward in Toronto, Ontario. Children at that point included Rebecca (8), William (5), Alfred (4), Rosey (2) and John (5 months).

In 1901, William (35) and Rebecca (35) were still in Toronto, along with William (16), Alfred (14), Rosina (12), John (10), Albert (8), Martha (5) and Charles (3). Eldest daughter, and my great- grandmother, Rebecca was already married by that point.

In 1911, William (46) and Rebecca (45) were living at 95 Jersey Avenue in Toronto with Alfred (24), Rose (22), John (20), Albert (18), Martha (15), Charles (13), Edward (9) and Ellen (4). John was a contractor.

William (56) and Rebecca (55), were still at 95 Jersey Avenue in 1921, at home with Edward (19) and Ellen (14).

Rebecca passed away at the Grace Hospital on June 26, 1922 and was buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery on June 29. William passed away the following April and was buried with her.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week thirteen.

My great-great grandfather William John Richardson was born on September 19, 1865 and baptized on October 8 of that same year. His parents were John and Charlotte (Jackman) Richardson and the family lived on Rushey Green in Lewisham, Kent, England. John was a gardener.

On the 1871 census, William is living with his parents, John (50) and Charlotte (33) at Waterloo Place. John is listed as an agricultural labourer.  Susannah (8) and William (5) are scholars. Thomas (3) and Alfred (1) are too young for school.

On the 1881 census, William is shown living at 4 Maybank Cottages with his widowed mother, Charlotte (44) and several siblings. Charlotte is a mangler (laundress) and the head of the household. Susannah (18) is a general servant, William (15) is a nurseryman’s boy, Alfred (11) and Charlotte (8) are scholars and then there is Frederick (2). Both Thomas and father John passed away sometime between 1871 and 1881.

Next door to the Richardsons were Charles and Ellen Lusty and their family, including 16-year-old daughter and domestic servant Rebecca Lusty. In November 1882, Rebecca and William were married. (And the following month William’s sister Susannah married Rebecca’s brother Charles.)

Very shortly after they were married, in January 1883, William and Rebecca welcomed their first child, daughter Rebecca Alice. She was the first of what would eventually be 10 children.

The family emigrated to Canada in 1887. On September 18, William and Rebecca, along with Rebecca (4), William (2) and Alfred (1) arrived in Quebec City, Quebec on board the Polynesian. It appears that William’s brother George and his family were also on board. William was listed as an agricultural labourer.

By 1891, William (26) and Rebecca (25) were living in St. Paul’s Ward in Toronto, Ontario. Children at that point included Rebecca (8), William (5), Alfred (4), Rosey (2) and John (5 months).

In 1901, William (35) and Rebecca (35) were still living in Toronto, along with William (16), Alfred (14), Rosina (12), John (10), Albert (8), Martha (5) and Charles (3). My great- grandmother Rebecca was already married by that point and no longer in the family home.

In 1911, William – listed as John (46) – and Rebecca (45) were living at 95 Jersey Avenue in Toronto with Alfred (24), Rose (22), John (20), Albert (18), Martha (15), Charles (13), Edward (9) and Ellen (4). John was a contractor.

The 1921 census shows William (56) and Rebecca (55), still at 95 Jersey Avenue, at home with Edward (19) and Ellen (14).

Rebecca passed away in 1922 and William followed the year after in April 1923. They are both buried in Toronto’s Mount Pleasant Cemetery, along with sons Alfred, John and Albert.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week twelve.

My great-great grandmother Alice Louisa Oakley was born on June 4, 1856. She was one of nine children born to Cornelius and Jane (Adams) Oakley. At the time of her birth, the family was living in Hove, Sussex, England.

By the 1861 census the family is in the parish of St. Mary’s Extra in Hampshire, England. Cornelius (45) and Jane (43) are listed along with children Cornelius (20), Alfred (16), Samuel (13), George (11), Thomas (8), Alice (4) and Emma (4 months). Eldest brother John William is already moved out of the family home and is married with a young child. Older sister, Sarah, was a servant working away from home.

Alice emigrated to Canada with some members of her family. They travelled on board the Ganges and arrived in Quebec on July 13, 1870. Cornelius (54) and Jane (52) were travelling with Alice (14), Emma (9) and Thomas (17). Older brother Alfred (26) and his wife Emily (26) were also on the ship, along with their three-year-old and 11 month old boys. It appears that 17-year-old Edward Pardoe Coulman was also travelling with the family. Edward would play a significant role in Alice’s life. Most of Alice’s siblings end up also emigrating to Canada.

The Oakleys are found in Montreal on the 1871 census. Stone cutter Cornelius (55) and Jane (53) are there along with Thomas (17), Alice (15), and Emma (10). Also with the family are Emily (26), Albert (4), Frederic (2) and Sarah (4 months).

On May 22, 1879, Alice Louisa Oakley marries Edward Pardoe. Edward was 27 years old and Alice was 22. Their marriage record says Edward was born in London, England to James and Mary Ann Coulman and Alice was born in Brighton to Cornelius and Jane Oakley. Edward is a commercial traveler. The marriage was witnessed by George Bailey and Emma Oakley.

The 1881 census shows Edward (27) married to Alice J. (24) and they have one son, James (1). They live next door to several Oakley relations in St. Stephen’s Ward in Toronto, Ontario.

By the 1891 census, Edward (39), Alice (35), and James (11) have been joined by Edward C. (8) and Walter (4). Edward Sr. is an undertaker supplies traveller. They are still living in St. Stephen’s Ward. Not listed on the census is daughter Katie, who was born in 1881 and, sadly, passed away in 1887.

In the 1901 census, Edward (48) and Alice (52) are living with three of their sons, James (21), Walter (13) and Norman (8). Edward is now listed as a photographer. Son Edward is married and has moved out.

Edward Pardoe died on December 16, 1908, leaving Alice a widow.

I am not sure where Alice is immediately after Edward’s death. I have not been able to locate her on the 1911 census. However, I have found a record from 1916 documenting Alice returning to Canada following a visit to her son Norman in Flint, Michigan. That at least raises the possibility that she was visiting the United States at the time of the census.

By the 1921 census, Alice (64) is living with eldest son James (34), his wife Elsie (31) and their son Ernest (4).

Alice Louisa passed away on October 10, 1947 at the age of 91 and is buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Toronto.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week eleven.

My great-great grandmother Alice Jane Burton was born on December 22, 1848. She was the first child born to Thomas Burton and Dionysia (Ansted) Burton. At the time the family was living in Loddon, Norfolk, England.

The 1851 census finds two-year-old Alice Jane living with Dionysia (23) and Thomas (34) in Thurton Hall in Thurton, Norfolk. Alice Jane’s younger brother, Thomas Northeast (5 months) is also part of the family along with a variety of domestic staff. The family is quite prosperous, with Thomas listed as a farmer with 269 acres and employing 10 labourers and 2 boys.

The 1861 census has the family living on Loddon Road. Thomas (45) and Dionysia (33) now have seven children: Alice Jane (12), Thomas Northeast (10), Arthur Henry (8), Edith Emily (6), Clara Dionysia (4), Margaret (2) and Helen (6 months). Thomas is still a farmer of 260 acres, employing 14 men and 2 boys. The family also continues to employ a number of household staff.

Something – I haven’t figured out exactly what yet – appears to happen to the family fortunes between 1861 and 1868, since in the latter year, the family can be found emigrating to Canada. The family sailed cabin class on the Thames, leaving London on September 24 and arriving in Quebec a month later on October 20. The ship’s manifest shows the family consisting of Thomas (52), Dionysia (42) and children Alice Jane (19), Thomas (17), Edith (14), Clara (11), Margaret (10), Helen (8), Clement (6), Leonard (4), Amy (2) and Frederick (4 months).

The Burtons settled in Montreal and they show up on the 1871 Canadian census in the Jacques Cartier district. The family at that time consists of Thomas (54), Dionysia (43) and their children: Alice Jane (22), Thomas Northeast (20), Arthur Henry (18), Edith (16), Clara Dionysia (14), Margaret (12), Helen (10), Clement William (8), Leonard Decimus (6), [Amy] Ansted (4), Frederick (3) and Charles (10 months). Thomas is listed as a cultivateur (farmer).

In March of 1873, Alice Jane married John George Johnson, son of Baptist and Ann (Kelly) Johnson.

In 1881, it appears John (33) and Alice (31) are living with John’s parents along with John’s youngest brother Joseph (22). However, other records – including later censuses – suggest that at the time of the 1881 census, John and Alice should have two children (Emily and Grace). I am still trying to figure out where they might be!

On the 1891 census, John (44) and Alice (43) are found at home with their children, Emily (14), Grace (13), Annie (10) and Margaret (8). And in 1901, John (54), Alice (52), Annie (20) and Margaret (17) are in the family home. The same is also true in 1911, when John (64), Alice (62), Annie (26) and Margaret (24) are living at home in St. Laurent.

By the 1921 census, however, John (74) and Alice (72), along with Annie (40), are living in Athelstan, Quebec. Sometime between 1911 and 1913 – when daughter Margaret married – the family moved from Montreal down to Athelstan. I have yet to figure out the ‘why’ for that move.

In 1928, on May 26, Alice Jane passed away. She was buried on May 28 in the Athelstan Presbyterian Church cemetery. John continued to live in Athelstan until he, too, passed away in 1939.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week ten.

My great-great grandfather John George Johnson was born on February 11, 1847. I believe he was the eldest son born to Baptist(e?) Johnson and Ann Kelly.

On the 1851 census, Baptist (30) and Ann (30) are shown living in St. Laurent, Quebec with their children John (5), William (3), Jane (2) and Ann (1). Also with the family is an Isabelle Johnston (20). I expect she is related to Baptist, perhaps his sister. Baptist, Ann and Isabelle were all born in Ireland, the children were all born in QuebecLower. It appears that the family is sharing a one storey stone house with Luc and Josephte Verdone.

I have yet to find the family on the 1861 census.

In 1871, Baptiste (50) and Ann (50) are home with their children John (24), William (22), Jane (21), Anny (19), Sara (17), Elizabeth (15) and Joseph (12) in St. Laurent, Quebec.

In March of 1873, John married Alice Jane Burton.

“John George Johnson of the St. Laurent District of Montreal and Alice Jane Burton of the same place, spinster, were married by licence on the ninth? day of March one thousand eight hundred and seventy-three by me,
WB Curran”

In 1881, it appears John (33) and Alice (31) are living with John’s parents Baptist (64) and Ann (60) along with John’s youngest brother Joseph (22). By the time of the 1881 census, John and Alice should have two children (Emily and Grace). I am still looking for them!

On the 1891 census, John (44) and Alice (43) are found at home with their children, Emily (14), Grace (13), Annie (10) and Margaret (8).

In 1901, John (54), Alice (52), Annie (20) and Margaret (17) are in the family home.

And again in 1911, John (64), Alice (62), Annie (26) and Margaret (24) are shown living at home in St. Laurent.

In 1921, John (74) and Alice (72), along with daughter Annie (40) are living in Athelstan, Quebec. I don’t know when they moved down there from Montreal. Given that when daughter Margaret was married in 1913, her marriage record showed her as being from Athelstan, I have to assume it may have been somewhere between 1911 and 1913.

Alice passed away in 1928.  John continued living in Athelstan until his death in January of 1939. The Huntingdon Gleaner reported on John’s passing, saying:

John Johnson, the oldest resident of this community, died at Athelstan Québec, the deceased was formerly of Montreal, but has made his home in Athelstan for many years. He was in his 92nd year. He is survived by three daughters, Mrs. James Lumsden, Mrs. Alva Wilson, and Mrs. John Fee, also four grandchildren. His wife predeceased him several years ago. Service held at the Athelstan Presbyterian Church, by the Rev. W. S. Duncan. Interred in the Athelstan Cemetery.

 

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