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Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week twenty-four.

My great-great-great grandfather Christopher Summerville was born in April 1822 in Irvinestown, Co. Fermanagh, Ireland to James and Jane (unknown) Somerville. Family legend suggests Christopher had five brothers – two went to Australia, one went to California, and two came to Ontario. I have not yet attempted to trace the other four – maybe someday!

He married Elizabeth Humphreys sometime around 1840, while they were still in Ireland.

They emigrated to Canada in 1846, as the potato famine was taking hold in Ireland. The records of James Allison, Emigrant agent at Montreal, show the family on June 19, 1846, on a “List of destitute emigrants forwarded to Montreal per steamer ‘Montreal’.” They are shown with a final destination of Toronto. The ‘family’ includes an adult male and an adult female, two children between the ages of 3 and 12 and a ‘free’. This would be Christopher and Elizabeth and their children John (about 5), Annie (about 3) and Jane (under a year).

Jane passed away the following month, on July 26, 1846. We had always believed she had died at sea, but it appears that she survived the voyage but not far beyond it.

By 1851, the family has settled in East Gwillimbury, York County, Ontario. The census shows Christopher (32), Elizabeth (33), John (10), Ann (8), Hugh (3), and Jane (1). Jane was named after her deceased sister. Christopher is listed as a labourer and the family is living in a one-story frame house.

In 1861, the family is still in East Gwillimbury, but their house is now a two-story frame, which suggests they have settled in well to life in Canada. Christopher (42) and Elizabeth (43) are living there with Ann (17), Hugh (12), Jane (10), Elizabeth (6), Christopher (4), and Mary (3). Christopher is listed as a labourer while Hugh and Jane are in school.

By 1871, Christopher (50) and Elizabeth (52) are home with Jane (20), Christopher (14) and Mary (13). Christopher is a labourer and Jane is now a seamstress. Christopher and Mary are attending school, but this is the first census where it is clearly indicated that Christopher cannot write and Elizabeth is unable to read or write.

In 1881, the family continues to live in East Gwillimbury. Christopher (60) and Elizabeth (59) are home with Christopher (24) and Mary (23). Christopher Sr. is still a labourer while Christopher Jr is a carriage maker.

The 1880s were not kind to the family. Christopher Jr. passed away in 1884 and Mary passed away at the beginning of 1886, followed by Elizabeth on November 3 of that year.

On July 2, 1887, Christopher remarried. The marriage records for the County of Simcoe, division of Bradford, show Christopher Somerville (son of James and Jane Somerville) of Irish descent marrying Sarah Pearsall (daughter of Robert and Sarah Pearsall). Sarah was 24 years old to Christopher’s 60.

By the 1891 census, Christopher (68) is show living with Sarah (27) and Albert (2). He is still a labourer. It looks like he may have been known as Christy, if that census is to be believed.

Christopher passed away on March 31, 1901. Although he was not a member of the Children of Peace, he was buried in their Sharon Burying Ground along with Elizabeth.

The 1901 census shows his widow, Sarah (36), living with Albert (12) and, I believe, her sister Mary Pearsall (28) who is shown as a lodger. They are now in the village of Sharon in the Township of East Gwillimbury.

At this point, I yet to determine what happened to Sarah and Albert following the 1901 census.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week twenty-three.

I don’t know very much about my great-great-grandmother Melissa Haight. She was born around 1819 to Harrison and Agnes (Doan) Haight. I am assuming she was born somewhere in Ontario County, Ontario.

I next pick up her trail around the time of her marriage to Reuben Thomas, sometime around 1841.

The 1851 census shows farmer Reuben (32) and Melissa (31) at home with Nicholas (7), Harrison (5), Philander (4), Sophronia (2) and Silas (1). Not shown is eldest daughter Agnes who passed away at three years of age. Also with the family is a servant, Catherine MacVale (20). The family is living in Whitby, Ontario.

The 1861 census shows Reuben (43), Melissa (incorrectly shown as 29), Nicholas (16), Harrison (15), Philander (13), Sophronia (12), Silas (10), Idilia (5) and Cynthia (2). In the gap between Silas and Idilia were William and Jane. William passed away at not quite a month old and Jane was not quite a year old when she died.

In 1871, Reuben (53) and Melissa (50) are still living in Whitby with Sophronia (21), Silas (20), Idilia (15), Cynthia (11), and Eva (10). Reuben and Silas are both listed as farmers.

Melissa passed away on February 27, 1873 at only 54. Reuben outlived her by decades, dying in 1909 at age 91.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week twenty-two.

My great-great-great grandfather Reuben Thomas was born on May 31, 1817 in Luxulyan, Cornwall, England, to Nicholas and Elizabeth (Phillips) Thomas.

Family lore suggests Reuben came to Canada around 1840. Shortly after his arrival in Canada, he was going over the field near Mariposa, Ontario, and saw Melissa Haight picking berries. He fell in love at first sight and they were married soon after. (So far, I haven’t been able to find any record of their marriage but expect it must have taken place between 1841 and 1843.)

The 1851 census shows farmer Reuben (32) and Melissa (31) at home with Nicholas (7), Harrison (5), Philander (4), Sophronia (2) and Silas (1). Not shown is eldest daughter Agnes who passed away at three years of age. Also with the family is a servant, Catherine MacVale (20). The family is living in Whitby, Ontario.

The 1861 census shows Reuben (43), Melissa (incorrectly shown as 29), Nicholas (16), Harrison (15), Philander (13), Sophronia (12), Silas (10), Idilia (5) and Cynthia (2). In the gap between Silas and Idilia were William and Jane. William passed away at not quite a month old and Jane was not quite a year old when she died. Reuben was a farmer and Nicholas was shown as a labourer.

In 1871, Reuben (53) and Melissa (50) are still living in Whitby with Sophronia (21), Silas (20), Idilia (15), Cynthia (11), and Eva (10). Reuben and Silas are both listed as farmers.

Melissa passed away on February 27, 1873.

By 1881, Silas (30) and his wife Rebecca (32) are living with their three children – Florence (3), Wilfred (2) and Melissa (1). Reuben (62) and youngest daughter Eva (20), along with farm labourer John Courtice (19) and servant Ida Michele (16), are living with Silas and Rebecca. Reuben has retired from active farming.

In 1891, Reuben (73) is living with Silas (40) and Rebecca (42), along with Florence (13), Wilfred (12), Melissa (11) and Clarence (9).

In 1901, Reuben (83) is still with Silas (50) and Rebecca (52), along with Melissa (21), Clarence (19), and Olivia (6) in Whitby.

Reuben died on April 25, 1909 at almost 92 years of age in Oshawa, Ontario.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week twenty-one.

My great-great-great grandmother Hannah Taylor was born on January 8, 1821. I believe she may have been born in Yorkshire, England.

Hannah married James Barker on November 18, 1839. One of the witnesses on the certified list of marriages where their marriage is listed is Charles Taylor. I assume this may be Hannah’s father or brother.

I can’t find the couple or their children on the 1851 census.

On the 1861 census, James (45) is listed as a farmer. Hannah (39) is with him along with John (17) and William (16), both labourers. Sarah (20), Samuel (14), Elizabeth (12), Aaron (11), Priscilla (9), Charles (7), Watson (5) and Hannah (2) are also at home. Also living with the family is Ann Taylor (82), presumably Hannah’s mother. The family is living in a 1 ½ story frame house in Brock Township, Ontario.

In 1871, James (55) and Hannah (51) are on the family farm with sons Samuel (24) and Aaron (20) (also listed as farmers). Charles (16), Daniel W (14) and Hannah (12) are at home and attending school.

By 1881, James (64) and Hannah (61) are alone in the family home and it appears James has retired from active farming, being listed as a Gentleman.

I have been unable to track the family down on the 1891 census.

Hannah passed away on February 2, 1892. James remarried and passed away himself in 1902.

 

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week twenty.

My great-great-great grandfather James Barker was born on March 15, 1816 in Yorkshire, England. I don’t know much about his early life but my current understanding is that he and one of his brothers emigrated to Canada in 1836.

James married Hannah Taylor on November 18, 1839.

I have yet to find the couple or their children on the 1851 census.

On the 1861 census, James (45) is listed as a farmer. Hannah (39) is with him along with John (17) and William (16), both labourers. Sarah (20), Samuel (14), Elizabeth (12), Aaron (11), Priscilla (9), Charles (7), Watson (5) and Hannah (2) are also at home. Also living with the family is Ann Taylor (82), presumably Hannah’s mother. The family is living in a 1 ½ story frame house in Brock Township, Ontario.

In 1871, the family James (55) and Hannah (51) are still on the family farm. Sons Samuel (24) and Aaron (20) are also listed as farmers. Charles (16), Daniel W (14) and Hannah (12) are also at home and attending school.

By 1881, James (64) and Hannah (61) are alone in the family home and it appears James has retired from active farming, being listed as a Gentleman.

I have been unable to track the family down on the 1891 census.

Hannah passed away on February 2, 1892. Following Hannah’s death, James remarried. On October 18, 1892, 75 year old James married 64 year old widow Mary (Cole) Houck.

The 1901 census shows James (85) and Mary (72) living in the Township of Brock.

James passed away from “old age” on August 19, 1902.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week nineteen.

My great-great-great grandmother Jane Lloyd was born in 1813 in Ireland. Her parents were John and Margaret (Glover) Lloyd and Jane was one of nine children.

Jane married James St. John on April 17, 1833 in Brock Township, Ontario.

By the 1851 census, the family had grown. Living in a one-and-a-half story stone house, Jane (38) and James (39) were at home with Philip (18), John (17), Margaret Ann (15), James (13), Maria (11), Eliza (9), Rebecca (7), Mary (5), Catherine (3), and William (1).

The 1861 census shows the family living in a two-story stone house in Brock Township. Jane (48) and James (49) are there with John (26), James (21), Mariah (19), Eliza (17), Mary (13), Catherine (11), William (9), Wesley (6), and Rebecca (4).

Jane passed away on April 19, 1864. James outlived her by decades, passing away in April 1904, at 92 years of age. They are both buried in the St. John Cemetery in Sunderland, Ontario.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week eighteen.

My great-great-great grandfather James St. John was born on February 25, 1812 in Rathkeale, County Limerick, Ireland. His parents were Philip and Nancy Ann (Baker) St. John. James was the eldest of eleven children.

The family emigrated to Canada, via New York, in 1817. My understanding is that his parents went on ahead and James came along with extended family later.

James married Jane Lloyd on April 17, 1833 in Brock Township, Ontario.

By the 1851 census, the family had grown. Living in a one-and-a-half story stone house, James (39) and Jane (38) were at home with Philip (18), John (17), Margaret Ann (15), James (13), Maria (11), Eliza (9), Rebecca (7), Mary (5), Catherine (3), and William (1). Also in the home was a 16-year-old Eliza Graham but I am not sure how she was connected to the family.

The 1861 census shows the family living in a two-story stone house in Brock Township. James (49) and Jane (48) are there with John (26), James (21), Mariah (19), Eliza (17), Mary (13), Catherine (11), William (9), Wesley (6), and Rebecca (4). Philip and Margaret Ann have likely married and moved out. The elder Rebecca passed away just before the younger Rebecca was born.

Jane herself passed away on April 19, 1864.

The 1871 census shows James (58) at home with Eliza (26), Mary (23), Catherine (21), William (19), Joseph (16), and Rebecca (13). Also with the family is a George St. John (37) and a Michael McCarthy (14). I am not sure precisely how they are connected, although George is somehow related.

The 1881 census, shows James (68) at home with Eliza (36) and Wesley (26).

On both the 1891 and 1901 censuses, James is living with his second youngest son William and William’s family.

James passed away from peritonitis on April 9, 1904, at 92 years of age.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week seventeen.

My great-great grandmother Margaret Hindle was born on October 14, 1853 in Chinguacousy, Ontario. Her parents were John Henry and Faith (Collins) Hindle, originally from Yorkshire, England. Margaret was one of fourteen children born to John and Faith.

The 1861 census finds the family in Chinguacousy. John (45) and Faith (45) are there along with John (21), James (18), Faith (16), Harriet (14), Elizabeth (13), Thomas (11), Henry (10), Margaret (9), William (6), Mary (4), Robert (3), and Sarah (1). Already out of the family home was eldest sister Anne, who had married a couple of years previously.

In 1871, John (57) and Faith (54) are home with Thomas (21), Henry (19), Margaret (17), William (15), Mary (13), Robert (12), Sarah (10) and Easther (8).

Margaret Hindle married James Davey in 1875 in Brampton, Peel County, ON. The exact date is not clear from the marriage registration but is probably July 15.

By the 1881 census, James (27) and Margaret (27) are living in Chinguacousy with their children William (5), John (3) and Edward (1).

The 1891 census shows James (37) and Margaret (37) with their children: William (15), John (13), Edward (11), Margaret (9), Samuel (7), Sarah (5), and Thomas (3).

I couldn’t find the family in the 1901 census in Canada. After a lot of digging, they turned up on the 1900 US census for Clinton Township, Macomb County, Michigan. That census shows James (46) and Margaret (46) along with their children: Samuel (16), Sarah (14), Andrew (8), Robert (7) and Alexander (4). James is a day labourer. The family had just arrived in the States at the time of the census.

By the 1911 census, the family is back in Canada. According to the census, the Davey farm was located on Lot 6, Concession 4 in Chinguacousy. James’ (56) occupation is listed as ‘Odd Jobs.’ Margaret (57) is also there along with Andrew (21), Robert (18), Alexander (15),  and Ethel (11). It appears that their son John (34) and his family are living with them.

On the 1921 census, James (67) and Margaret (67) are found at home in Chinguacousy with Ethel (21) and Louise (9). Also with the family is James Neal (27), a labourer. At this time, I’m not sure how precisely Louise and James are connected to the family. James Davey’s mother was a Neal so James Neal is probably family, but I’m not sure what the relationship might be.

James died on February 22, 1925, at 71 years of age. Margaret followed him on October 11, 1931 at 76 years of age of what appears to be listed as ‘acute indigestion.’

 

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week sixteen.

My great-great grandmother Hannah Dool was, according to the 1901 census, born in January 1823 in Ireland. Her death registration shows that she was born in January 1820. I haven’t yet determined exactly where (although, as with her husband Robert Hunter, the County Antrim/Belfast area seems likely). And I have no additional information about her family – parents or siblings.

I do know she married Robert Hunter sometime around 1840 while still in Ireland. They emigrated to Canada shortly thereafter.

The 1851 Canadian census finds Robert (35) and Hannah (29) living in Chinguacousy, Peel County, Ontario. Their children at that time included James (11) and Thomas (9). The census says they were both born in Ireland. Robert (8), William (6), John (4) and Joseph (2) were all born in Canada. This suggests the family emigrated somewhere around 1842.

Since last week, I managed to finally locate at least part of the family on the 1861 census. Robert (50) and Hannah (39) are show in Chinguacousy with John (13), Joseph (11) and Alexander (9). I have yet to determine where James, Thomas, Robert and William are. Given that they would be between 16 and 21 at the time, I expect that they might be out working elsewhere.

By 1871, however, all four eldest boys are back home again with their parents in Chinguacousy Township. Robert (55) and Hannah (48) are home with James (30), Thomas (28), Robert (26), William (24), John (22), Joseph (19), Alexander (17), Henry (16), Hugh (7) and Jacob (5), along with sisters Mary (14), Jane (11) and Hannah (9). Of the fourteen children I am aware of that were born to Robert and Hannah, only one (Issac, Jacob’s twin) died in early childhood.

By 1881, Robert (60) and Hannah (57) are still in Chinguacousy with William (31), Jane (22), Hannah (19), Hugh (17) and Jacob (15).

Robert passed away on May 29, 1888. Consequently, the 1891 census shows a widowed Hannah (70) with just Hugh (26) and Jacob (24) at home.

In 1901, Jacob (35) is showing as the head of household. His mother, Hannah (77), is living with him.

On October 22, 1908, at 88 years old, Hannah passed away from ‘senile decay’.

Amy Johnson Crow, on her blog No Story Too Small, has challenged her fellow bloggers to post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. This is week fifteen.

My great-great grandfather Robert Hunter was born around 1821 in Ireland. I haven’t yet determined exactly where in Ireland (although rumour has that it was the County Antrim/Belfast area). I don’t know exactly when he was born, nor who his parents were, nor if he had siblings! Obviously I still have much work to do.

However, I do know he married Hannah Dool sometime around 1840 while they were still in Ireland. They emigrated to Canada shortly thereafter.

The 1851 Canadian census finds Robert (35) and Hannah (29) living in Chinguacousy, Peel County, Ontario. Robert is a weaver. At that time, their children included James (11) and Thomas (9). The census says they were both born in Ireland. Robert (8), William (6), John (4) and Joseph (2) were all born in Canada. This suggests the family emigrated somewhere around 1842.

I have yet to find the family on the 1861 census but by 1871, they have grown in number. They are still in Chinguacousy Township but now at home with Robert (55) and Hannah (48) are James (30), Thomas (28), Robert (26), William (24), John (22), Joseph (19), Alexander (17), Henry (16), Hugh (7) and Jacob (5), along with sisters Mary (14), Jane (11) and Hannah (9). Of the fourteen children born to Robert and Hannah, only one (Issac, Jacob’s twin) died in infancy. Robert is still a weaver but all the boys old enough to be working are listed as labourers, except for Joseph who is a telegraph operator.

By 1881, Robert (60) and Hannah (57) are still in Chinguacousy with William (31), Jane (22), Hannah (19), Hugh (17) and Jacob (15). Robert is now listed as a farmer, as is William.

Robert passed away on May 29, 1888 of Bright’s disease. My understanding is that he is buried in Mayfield United Church cemetery.

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